• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Describe the disadvantages faced by Catholics in Northern Ireland in the mid 1960’s

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Cassie Arbour History coursework Question 1 Describe the disadvantages faced by Catholics in Northern Ireland in the mid 1960's In the mid 1960's Protestants discriminated against Catholics in Northern Ireland. Discrimination against Catholics became a feature of Northern Ireland. Catholics were not welcomed in to government, jobs or housing. Protestants owned most of the industries and they feared that Catholics would move to where they lived and out number the Protestants. In Derry in 1966all of the city's council workers were Protestant. Out of 177 paid employees, 145 were protestant earning �124-�424 where only 32 were Catholic and only earning �20-�420. Out of 10 000 workers in the Belfast's shipyard (the biggest source of employment in the city) only 400 were Catholic. In the county Fermanagh no senior council posts were catholic and in that county out of 75 bus drivers only 7 were Catholic. ...read more.

Middle

other sports they both played but because more money was given to Protestant schools they had better equipment and so Catholic children were discriminated against. At the same time television was entering Northern Ireland, and the people both Protestant and Catholic were seeing how the rest of the world lived. There was a Protestant group called the Orange order. They professed loyalty to the English Crown and to Protestantism. They swear an oath to eradicate the Catholic Church. Not all the members thought they had to go out and kill every Catholic they meet but in the 60's it was an instrument of discrimination that was done in the name of God. Protestant councils also discriminated against Catholics "one has been to put Protestants in better houses than Catholics but charge the same rents...Another way has simply been to house more Protestants than Catholics. ...read more.

Conclusion

So, the students started to encourage squatting in empty houses that the Northern Ireland housing authority wouldn't allocate to the Catholics. This started a clash with the RUC (Royal Ulster Constabulary) the British state police of Ireland. The RUC came in and forcibly removed the squatting families from these houses. This began the downward spiral into the war today. Unemployment for Catholics linked on with Poverty, poor medical health services and then a higher death rate. GERRYMANDER. Terrance O'Neill who was Protestant wanted to join Protestants and Catholics together. The Protestants did not like this idea and wanted O'Neill to go. In 1968 the Catholics marched peacefully for equality but they received a violent response. The Protestants thought the Catholics wanted to take over which was wrong. Fighting started and O'Neill resigned. Unionist leaders were deeply suspicious of socialism. Some of their actions to reduce the threat of the labour movement actually resulted in discrimination against Catholics. Discrimination started in the 1920's and 1930's so by now it was not an unusual thing. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Northern Ireland 1965-85 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Northern Ireland 1965-85 essays

  1. The History of Conflict in Ireland.

    So, the death of Mountbatten and all the rest of it actually turned out to be a propaganda coup for the IRA rather than a loss for them. The 1987 Enniskillen Bombing When the IRA exploded the bomb in Enniskillen in November of 1987, they did their cause irreparable harm from the military perspective.

  2. How Did the Catholics Grow To hate the Protestants?

    He lives in Dundalk, Co Louth in the Irish Republic, and is thought to have taken with him a number of the IRA's bomb makers as well as details of arms dumps. This has increased pressure on Sinn Fein to ensure that weapons are handed over before they get into the wrong hands.

  1. Describe the disadvantages faced by Catholics in Northern Ireland in the mid-1960s.

    They see the threat arising from 'Dublin' (F) and will not accept 'being united' (F) as the campaign to 'suppress Protestantism increases.' (F) This view is clearly similar to the Israelis view that 'we are God's chosen people.' As 'Catholicism is unscriptural' (D) Source H believed that the 'underprivileged minority' were an utter drain on the economy and

  2. Describe the disadvantages faced by the Catholics in Northern Ireland in the mid- 1960s?

    Housing was another disadvantage that the Catholics faced. From an educational book by Ben Walsh says that "Two thirds of the houses built by local authorities after the war went to Protestants" that is a big difference and there is some prejudice here. Catholics also tended to live in overcrowded housing as shown from the census that Catholics

  1. Describe the disadvantages faced by Catholics in

    We can see that this happened in Londonderry (Derry) where there was 36,049 Catholics and only 17,695 Protestants. After the voting regulations had been applied 14,325 Catholics were entitled to a vote against only 9,235 Protestants. From the numbers given it should have been the Catholics who won control but

  2. Describe the disadvantages faced by the Catholics in Northern Ireland in the mid-1960s.

    When new houses were being built in the years from the Second World War and 1969 by Fermanagh county council, 1021 out of 1569 or about 70% of the houses went to Protestant families. This is a big disadvantage for Catholics because they are not having equal rights and because

  1. Describe the disadvantages faced by Catholics in Northern Ireland in the mid 1960's.

    I believe that in the next few years, the situation in Northern Ireland will continue to improve. Already there is a school run by both Protestants and Catholics, which clearly indicates to me that the countries unfairness is disappearing with the help of those who are open-minded.

  2. Describe the disadvantages faced by the Catholics in Northern Ireland in the mid-1960s.

    People who had a certain value of property would get a second vote; this favoured the Protestants because they were the ones most likely to have a property of high value. Even in areas where the Catholics were a majority, there was always Protestants voted.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work