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Describe the Effects of the Blitz on Everyday life in Britain.

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Introduction

Describe the Effects of the Blitz on Everyday life in Britain. During the Blitz, the British life was adversely affected in a way it had never been affected to before. The collective psyche of the country was changed and almost every Briton had to deal with physical changes to their surroundings and landscape. Everyday life was affected in two main ways, the psychological trauma and the physical effects. Both were as important as the other and affected everyday life in Britain. Firstly, Physically many changes occurred to Britain. During the Blitz, 1,400,000 people were made homeless by bombs hitting their homes. At one point, one in six Londoners were homeless. Despite the physical aspect of this, it also provided the government a huge logistical problem for the government and caused may emotional grievances for the homeless. ...read more.

Middle

Economically many businesses were left stranded as many bosses left for work in the morning to find their offices bombed. Yet, the absenteeism rate remained low as many people were determined to comfort themselves with the maintenance of familiar routines. The Blitz was widely known as "an attack on the senses" and was psychologically very threatening. Many people had to cope with fear, but not just for their lives, but also for family, friends and others. There was also a large fear of an invasion of Britain, which adversely affected the everyday life in Britain, as almost everybody feared the impending doom that seemed to be heading to Britain. This also caused widespread panic that affected lives as people tried to cope with the panicky attitude many people adopted to the Blitz lifestyle. ...read more.

Conclusion

Another psychological affect of the Blitz was the rationing. Many people were negatively affected by this and turned to looting destroyed stores for extra food and items of clothing etc... However not all effects were so negative. Positions in jobs that had never been open to women soon became valuable and women were treated as part of the war effort as well further increasing steps to equality with men. In conclusion, the Blitz has many myths about what happened to everyday life and the people. The so-called "blitz spirit" became the prominent feature of the Blitz but truly many people instead of banding together in singsong gritted their teeth and just tried to live through the day. In addition, many logistical reasons threatened the government such as lack of burial spaces, lack of coffins, orphaned children. The Blitz affected every person either psychologically or mentally in his or her everyday life. ...read more.

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