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Describe the effects of the Blitz on everyday life in Britain

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Introduction

Describe the effects of the Blitz on everyday life in Britain The Blitz had a major effect on everyday life; 1469000 people were evacuated at the beginning of the war, out of the people who chose to stay, 1.2 million citizens were left homeless 42 000 died, and 45 000 were injured. London was the worst affected area; however other towns such as Cardiff and Manchester were affected. Rural areas were not affected as much simply because there were not as many lights, making it harder for the bombers to see where to aim. 'One man told me that his young sons were killed in front of him and he gently laid them together on his front lawn. ...read more.

Middle

Only 6 percent of Londoners were taking shelters in underground stations, because most people felt comfortable at home. It was not wise to have so many people in one place as it was an easy target, although the Germans were not able to hit the underground easily because of its depth below ground. 'I remember an incendiary bounced off a corner and went down into the underground, it exploded a water pipe and sixty four people died that day ' This quote was never published, because of the amounts of people taking shelter in the underground shelter. The air-raid wardens were very important. They were contacted whenever a bomb was dropped, and then they would contact other services, such as the fire service, or an ambulance. ...read more.

Conclusion

It had its pros and cons, because they had to combine this with their family life and it was good for the people; to keep active so they would not have time to worry, it was also joining the people and their communities. The industry was not affected much, because it was hard for the German's to drop bombs on the factories at night, and if they did it would be up and running in two-three days. The people never lost much hope; this is because the government was desperate to keep up the morale of the people, by using censorship and propaganda. Casualty numbers and serious damage was withheld from the public. However heroism and defiance were on the front pages. Many people were hired by the government, to make inspiring films about after the war, to help overcome the demoralising effects of the bombing. ...read more.

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