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Describe the effects of the blitz on everyday life in Britain?

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Introduction

Describe the effects of the blitz on everyday life in Britain? The blitz affected everyone in Britain. The effects all depended on who you were and where you were in the country. the rich people during the blitz had a major advantage because they were wealthy they were more likely to have an Anderson s helter because they had gardens and Anderson shelters are much stronger than Morrison shelters which is the shelter that un-wealthy people would have had. Also rich people had the money to reconstruct their houses and had the money to move away from the cities where it was most damaged. Big cities and central London was more affected then places like the countryside and outside of London. This is because big industries were located in cities. Areas such as the west end of London were effected because Germany wanted to damage Britain's industry , economy and it also had places such as parliament, Buckingham palace which will effect peoples morale seeing them getting damaged as they are places that symbolises Britain. Although the countryside was less disrupted by the blitz it had its own unique factors it had to deal with such as city evacuees coming in there town living with them. Also it affected farmers from the countryside because Britain were reducing there imports and exports. The people of Britain in the blitz were more affected then all the other wars such as world war 1.this is because the Luftwaffe were targeting civilians by bombing towns and cities. ...read more.

Middle

Children each carried one suitcase containing their belongings, a label around their neck with name and other information, and each would also carry a gas mask around their neck inside a little box in case they experienced a gas attack. Although it was hard for families to let their children go, it was a positive move. Children from working class families went to live in middle class houses and vice versa. Many of the children were better off after the evacuation and they experienced a happy side to the war. Britain imported a huge bulk of its food from foreign countries, such as America. During the Blitz, many of the ships carrying this food across the ocean were sunk and so Britain's food supply began to go scarce and there wasn't enough to go around. Rationing was introduced in January 1940 and continued until some time after the war. Foods like butter sugar and bacon were the first to be rationed, but many others such as sweets, jam, cheese, tea and eggs were all added over the years. Also the people was advised to grow there own food, so that shipping space could be freed for essential war supplies. In addition, clothes and petrol were rationed. The 'Make Do and Mend' campaign was introduced to encourage people to alter old clothes instead of buying new ones, and cars were driven less to cut down on petrol. ...read more.

Conclusion

week, and now got done when I had the time" this shows how hard it was for women at the time of the blitz as they had so many things to do and had no time to do them all. The government also gave more support to the people and began to have a bigger impact on people's lives. As a result of this, they began to come closer and the social classes began to mix a bit. At the beginning of the war they all tried to have a good time and most of them did. In London, people still went to dance halls in the evenings and went on trips to the theatre. This raised the morale of the people and kept them on a high note for a while. However, as people saw the reality of the war, they began to feel terror and became very depressed. Some even wished that they were dead as they had no job, family or home. Overall death and destruction was the worst effect to everyday life in Britain during the blitz. Britain still survived the blitz due to the people keeping there sprits high and not letting Germany defeat there morale. Everyone played a part during the blitz and tried to make everyday life better for them by rationing and growing there own food. Despite the bombs and attacks going on the people of Britain still had high spirits to keep them going throughout the war. ...read more.

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