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Describe the effects of the Blitz on everyday life in Britain.

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Introduction

Sarah Higgs 11:4 7th October 2. Describe the effects of the Blitz on everyday life in Britain. The Blitz in Britain started in September 1940. The Blitz was long anticipated by Britons, so long, in fact, that many began to believe that it would never arrive. When the Blitz was first predicted, the people of Britain made some incredibly substantial changes to both their lifestyle and where many of them lived. These preparations for the Blitz actually started in 1939, and the gap between the predicted Blitz and the actual Blitz occurring is known as the Phoney War. Between 1939 and 1940 thousands of children were evacuated from the major towns and cities to the countryside, where they had to stay with accommodating, and sometimes not, families. All across Britain people were forced to ration everything they ate and used. For example, everybody was given a ration book each with which they had a certain amount of points a week that they could us to purchase whatever products they may have needed or wanted. These effects on the people of Britain were caused by the Blitz, but were actually occurring before the Blitz had even started. ...read more.

Middle

As well as booklets giving advice on gas masks, the government to aid the people of Britain through the Blitz created booklets concerning many necessary things at this time, such as advice on rationing, evacuation, etc., and documentary films were also produced. The government felt the need to censor newspaper as well, to protect the people of Britain and protect them from exactly what was happening in Britain. Despite these attempts, everybody in the country lived in the constant fear of an attack; they were unexpected, sudden and if one happened very close to you, there was nothing much that anybody could do. This fear undoubtedly effected people's everyday lives, often giving them reason to feel bleak and uncertain about their future, if they had any. Homes were lost all over Britain, and around two in every seven houses were bombed. This damage extended further than property; thousands of lives were lost because of the bombing, and it effected anybody and everybody. To try and help these people, during an air raid certain advice and help was given. First all, many people bought either an Anderson shelter, which was placed in a hole dug in the garden or a Morrison shelter which was a sheet of steel mesh placed beneath a dining table in the house where a person could hide during an air raid. ...read more.

Conclusion

With transport damaged, many everyday things were effected, such as the movement of food from factories and farms to towns and cities, where it was badly needed. As well as this, things like weapons, ammunition and parts of army crafts and warheads could not be taken from one place to another, and these were needed more than anything else during the Blitz. Places that were most badly effected by all the things mentioned before were main towns and cities such as London, Birmingham, Manchester, Coventry, etc. However, less important towns were still attacked and suffering the same things as everyone else, especially those that effected people nation-wide, such as rationing, inflation, etc. The worst aspects of the Blitz on everyday life on Britain were those that effected everybody. The main ones being rationing, evacuation of children and living in the constant fear of being attacked; never knowing whether they may wake up the next day or not. This fear stemmed from everything that the Blitz caused, but had the greatest effect on the people of Britain because it effected them emotionally, and this was what either led them to give up, or fight back harder. ...read more.

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