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Describe the ways in which the methods of the Suffragists and Suffragettes were different

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Introduction

Describe the ways in which the methods of the Suffragists and Suffragettes were different In 1918 many women over the age of 30 gained suffrage and subsequently to this, in 1928 all women over the age of 21 were given suffrage in parliamentary elections. Before the vote for women was given, women were vigorously campaigning for suffrage. One of the main suffrage campaigning group was the NUWSS, (National Union of Women's Suffrage Societies), or other known as the Suffragists. This was a democratic organisation led by Millicent Garrent Fawcett. Contrasting this group was the more militant group led by Emmeline Pankhurst known as the WSPU, (Women's Social and Political Union), or also identified as the suffragettes. NUWSS and WSPU was different because of the methods they used, however, they were united in their cause. The NUWSS and WSPU started off with similar methods to campaign for women's suffrage. The Liberals who had recently won the general election and both the NUWSS and WSPU thought they had a better likelihood of acquiring suffrage from the Liberals. This encouraged the NUSWSS and the WSPU to campaign and put additional pressure onto politicians. Canvassing was one of the most frequently used methods both the Suffragists and Suffragettes used. The NUSWSS style of publicity was peaceful, moderate and law abiding whereas the WSPU's was bold and flamboyant. ...read more.

Middle

As a result, the WSPU called a halt to their militant activities and the NUWSS and WSPU worked hard to win the support of these measures. This portrays the similarity of the suffragists and the suffragettes as when there was hope the suffragettes attempted to shrew a willed front. This also showed that the suffragettes were initially a splinter group that emerged from the suffragists, so on the whole their methods of campaigning would always hold some similarities. The WSPU's peace had shattered in November 18th 1910, other known as Black Friday WHEN Asquith interfered with women's suffrage. This showed the increase of frustration in women's campaigning. 500 suffragettes marched into the House of Commons and the police did not handle the situation well, resulting in 150 women being assaulted. The suffragettes voiced their frustration at the Conciliation Committee, which inquired the events of 'Black Friday'. This highlighted the difference in the methods of the suffragists and the suffragettes because the suffragists were greatly disappointed whereas the suffragettes were furious, which inspired them to used more violent methods in order to voice their anger. Both suffrage groups relied on publicity to a certain extent because they would allow the public to visualise their demands and gain more supporters. The suffragist's march of 6000 feminists carrying around 1000 banners about the urgent need for votes for women was a great success. ...read more.

Conclusion

The final major WSPU demonstration was very violent and portrayed the suffragette method of campaigning. In May 21st 1914 over 200 women had marched to Buckingham Palace with the intention of obtaining the King's support for women's suffrage. Most of the women were arrested due to the outbreak of violence and vandalism. This overall depicts the difference in the suffragettes and the suffragists because Buckingham Palace was the symbol of England and by protesting in it showed the importance of the vote for women. Furthermore, it illustrates that the suffragettes relied on publicity to get their voices heard as many newspapers captured the event, whereas the suffragists relied more on their democratic skills of campaigning. In conclusion the suffragists and suffragettes used different methods to campaign for women's suffrage. During the first phase of the campaign the WSPU used more peaceful methods of campaigning, yet even then it was close to breaking the law. During the second stage of campaigning, the suffragettes became much bolder and began breaking the law. By the third phase of campaigning the suffragettes had reached their peak of violence whereas the suffragists had always remained peaceful. Although both groups had the same aim, the suffragettes believed that more militant methods would be necessary. They constantly battled against the government whereas the suffragists attempted to work with the government. ?? ?? ?? ?? 1 1 ...read more.

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