• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Did England become Protestant in the sixteenth century?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Did England become Protestant in the sixteenth century? Well you can't decide because either the monarch was Protestant or Catholic. Because Henry VIII was a Catholic, Edward was a Protestant, Mary was a Catholic and Elizabeth was a Protestant so you really can't tell. When Henry was on the throne he was a Catholic. In 1509 Henry was clearly a good Catholic, he supported the Pope. In 1521 Henry VIII was given the title Fidei Defensor by the Pope. Henry had defended the Catholics against criticism in Europe. By defending the Catholic faith, the Pope rewarded him with the title. But in 1533 Henry wanted to divorce Catherine of Aragon because she couldn't produce a male heir not a female heir. He needed a son because at that time men were thought to be more important than woman and they thought woman to be weak and because the last name Tudor would still go on. Catherine was getting too old and it looked as she wouldn't have anymore children so Henry wanted to marry someone else. ...read more.

Middle

Earl of Warwick was now getting popular and was even encouraging Edward VI into declaring his majority as soon as he was sixteen. But as always he wanted power so he wanted Lady Jane Grey to be Edward's successor. He planned to rule through the Duchess of Suffolk's daughter, Lady Jane Grey. Edward was poorly ill sand sick and died young at the age of fifteen in 1553.He is Protestant because he was brought up in the Protestant religion. Then Mary took over in 1553. Mary's first act was to validate Henry's marriage to Catherine of Aragon so she was legitimate. She is well remembered for returning England from Protestantism to Roman Catholicism. She was popular in her earlier parts of reign but when after she married Philip her popularity went downfall. Mary was 39 years old when she took the throne and she married the Prince of Spain called Philip II so that her half-sister, the Princess Elizabeth, from succeeding to the throne. This was unpopular because Spain might rule England. She was a strict Catholic and killed anyone who wasn't Catholic. The changes Edward did were immediately changed back. ...read more.

Conclusion

Elizabeth reigned for a long time and died in 1603 of frailty and insomnia. She is Protestant because she supports Protestants and wants Protestantism to be the main religion. So England was neither a Protestant or Catholic country. Protestant Catholic Edward VI Henry VIII Elizabeth I Mary I So you can see it is equal monarchs of the same religion. When each time there is a different religion in big towns there is a big change but in small villages there is a small difference in their life. So every time a Catholic was on the throne there would be statues and alters in the church and when a Protestant was on the throne there would be ordinary things. Inside the Catholic Church there was a rood-screen, statues, alters, stained glass windows, chalice and a surplice. Inside the Protestant Church there was wine, bread, common book of prayers, surplice, plain glass, pupit and a table. As you see this would be very confusing every time there was a Protestant or Catholic monarch. So did England become Protestant in the sixteenth century? No, it was neither Protestant nor Catholic because there is an equal amount of monarchs in the same religion. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE History Projects section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE History Projects essays

  1. Did Mary Tudor deserve the title 'Bloody Mary'

    She said this so she would sound/be fair. But it is very useful as Mary herself said it. This source is supported by source E page 24 - worksheet, "Mary saved them" Mary didn't just burn them without thinking, she thought why should she burn them and when she thought about how they were involved in the rebellion

  2. Castles, the key to power in Medieval England

    In a few days all of the people and the horses would eat all of the food the manor could supply. One of Henry's clerks wrote saying how much the King would pay for food when he stayed at Salisbury Castle, a measure would be about enough to fill half a modern bath.

  1. How did WW2 effect civilians in England and Wales

    from behind enemy lines concerning the fate of friends and relatives who hadn't return from bombing raids over Germany. As a result, Allied troops and civilians frequently listened to Lord Haw-Haw's broadcasts in spite of the sometimes infuriating content and frequent inaccuracies and exaggerations, in the hope of finding clues about the fate of troops and air crews.

  2. did 'Bloody Mary' deserve her title?

    Northumberland was forced to surrender and was executed. Although Lady Jane was spared for a while, a rebellion against the queen provoked Mary to order her execution. The essay question is so controversial as many say that if Mary had produced a Catholic heir, then she would never have acquired this name.

  1. Like most castles in the South of England, all of the changes at Portchester ...

    palace like home was to reward him of his good deeds The Early Tudors 1495-1545AD At this time Portchester Castle became much less important as Portsmouth was developed as a permanent royal dockyard in 1495. This was a blow to Portchester as the castle had previously been a base for

  2. How useful is a visit to the Tudor parts of Hampton Court to find ...

    was built in 1479 to be used as a banqueting hall for the palace. Hampton Court also has a magnificent great hall (as seen below) and was used in exactly the same way. Eltham palace was the childhood home of Henry and it remained his home up until he married Anne Boleyn.

  1. 1. Stourbridge Fair was the greatest of and most celebrated fairs of all England. ...

    "It was held in September and at its height, lasted for three full weeks," This is a reliable source because it is from the book 'Trade Places' by Christine Redington. Both fairs specialise in one good in particular, as Midsummer specialised in trading china, giving it the name 'pot fair'.

  2. WHY HAS TERRORISM BECOME SUCH AN IMPORTANT ISSUE OVER THE LAST 40 YEARS?

    This feeling of injustice is also supported by source 7 from a private in the British Army during the 70s who says that due to the way searches were carried out only in Nationalist areas of Belfast ?they saw the British Army as the enemy, a foreign occupying force.? Both sources are primary sources.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work