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Did the German people benefit from the nazi rule ? In 1933, one of the worlds most evil dictators came into power

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Introduction

Did the German people benefit from the nazi rule ? In 1933, one of the worlds most evil dictators came into power, his name is Adolf Hitler. He had an objective which consisted of gaining the support or the people of Germany. Hitler was adamant to pursue Nazi rule of else he would go to extremes. Hitler knew he needed to persuade the people of Germany that this was the way forward. He achieved this by using propaganda techniques. He made Joseph Goebbles the minister of propaganda. Goebbels proved to be very successful in his line of work by persuading young Germans to join the Nazi forces. Hitler was an aggressor who frightened people who failed to believe what Goebbels was telling them and if they stood in the way of the nazi rule Hitler would have them punished. ...read more.

Middle

They were pleased that he got government contracts to start and supply armaments as they would be making more profit. Workers joined organisations such as "strength through joy" which gave them cheap holidays and sporting activities. But workers were still earning less under Nazi rule. Hitler gained confidence when he gained the popularity of the old and the young people of Germany. Hitler hated the Versailles settlement, he vowed to defy this settlement by going into the Rhineland and taking over Austria. When Hitler did this the people of Germany felt more security and pride in their nation. Hitler promised the old Germans respect by destroying the treaty and the young would get employment. This as reinforced by the 1936 Berlin Olympics. This was reinforced by the 1936 Berlin Olympics. Many people in Germany felt that they had no freedom and could not express their concerns freely. ...read more.

Conclusion

Hitler put millions of people through living hell during his time as chancellor. He had a deep hatred of Jews, alcoholics, gypsies and insane people. In 1935 the Nuremberg laws meant that Jews lost their rights and couldn't marry Germans. One of the most famous night of Hitler's reign of terror was "The Night of the Broken Glass". Hitler ordered his men to destroy anything and everything that was Jewish. This was followed by the murder of six million Jews who were bound to concentration and horrifically murdered in the gas chambers. Hitler was evil but he had very little opposition. He was a superb speaker who came across as a strong leader to the German people. In the end it wasn't opposition in world war two. Hitler did restore the pride of the German nation and he was worshipped by millions. The master race definitely benefited under the Nazis but minority groups did not have the same experience. By Robert Bates ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

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