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Did The German People Benefit From The Weimar Government Between 1924 And 1929?

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Introduction

Did The German People Benefit From The Weimar Government Between 1924 And 1929? After Allied forces had defeated the Imperial rule in Germany, a chance emerged for Germany to 'repair' their country, by forming a stable democracy. This chance to start afresh was taken, and a German National Assembly met in the town of Weimar, due to the instability of other major towns. In the town of Weimar, this national assembly formed the Weimar Constitution - a constitution that would serve 62,000,000 Germans (according to a 1925 census) - so how did the democratic system of Government benefit the public? Essentially the constitution came in two parts, dealing with both the: - Structure & Tasks Of The Federation - Fundamental Duties & Rights Of The Germans The first part (structure) is less concerned with welfare for Germans, and whilst this part is crucial in the mechanics of the system of Government, it is not directly relevant to the German public. The most important statement in the Structure section is article 1: "The German federation is a republic. Supreme power emanates from the people" The second part (fundamental duties & rights) is more useful in showing the potential benefits for the public, as a result of the change to the democratic system of government. It is important to recognise that whilst many of these articles of the constitution sound good, they may not always have been successfully applied. ...read more.

Middle

The German government ordered passive resistance from the workers of the Ruhr, which was one of the major economic profit-spinners of Germany. The government agreed to pay the wages of the workers for the passive disobedience, and finding that they could neither pay these, nor the repayments began deficit financing. This caused hyperinflation - and money became simply worthless. The middle and upper classes were dreadfully affected, as their hard earned money suddenly became worthless. People were being paid - but having to take their wheelbarrow to collect all of the money, such was the scale of the inflation. The only thing that really retained its wealth was property. The deficit financing, intentional or not (to appear unable to pay repayments and thus have them lowered) not only crippled the nations economy - but crippled the German public also - by all accounts, for the public it was not a smart move. The German public also suffered a depression - which was in total fairness to the German government, a worldwide one as a result of the Wall Street crash in 1929 - 6 years after hyperinflation. Even through this depression the Germans only recognised the good parts of their economy - and believed thus that Germany had a strong and thriving economy. They were wrong however - Germany had been in economic trouble since the end of the First World War - and probably before. ...read more.

Conclusion

The instability of the system of Government was not good either. As covered in a previous essay - there were too many parties, catering for too many different interests, which was not really beneficial for the public. Whilst presumably the range of parties would give greater choice and greater diversity for the people in political parties, it actually proved instrumental in the fact that Germany simply couldn't produce a strong party, neither a strong government, or coalition! Whilst choice is often good, it wasn't here, and the constant switching of policies and parties would not just have been confusing, but also detrimental to the country, with fundamental elements being shaken up and turned around consistently. Germany had been left in a state by the Imperial government. The new democracy was not left with not much to work with - a lot needed doing to get the state in a respectable shape. Germany had been torn apart by war, and the steps that the government tried to take through stability measures, and attempting to turn the country into a more respectable nation in the process. They did achieve stunted success, and the public did seem to see an improvement. It was a tough time for a new government - but the public seemed to enjoy a more stable lifestyle, with better foreign relations and better attitudes being shown towards Germany - at least until 1933, and the rise of the Nazis. ...read more.

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