• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Do both Levack and Oldridge support this view of the changing role of the Devil in Early Modern Europe?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Gemma Humphrys The Reformation led to a more profound fear of the Devil. Do both Levack and Oldridge support this view of the changing role of the Devil in Early Modern Europe? The Reformation was a period from around 1520- 1650. It was a time of religious revolution, where Christianity was being reformed and people were led to reject Catholic traditions and to break with the Papacy. Protestantism was becoming a much more influential religion. Levack and Oldridge mention many reasons why the Reformation led to the increased fear of the Devil, and both try to explain their reasons. Darren Oldridge explains how people before the Reformation saw the devil. ...read more.

Middle

Oldridge explains how Catholics see the Devil. They believed in the Devil, but believed that there was a way of defeating him. He explains that when the Reformation occurred, Protestants started to reject the practises of Catholicism. They, therefore, were rejecting the 'magic' rituals that Catholics used to fend off the Devil. This meant that Protestants had to invent their own methods of defeating him. The medieval perspectives were that the Devil could assume a physical form and this concern for physical details, especially by Protestants, emphasised the bodily reality of the Devil. People believed that the Devil was located inside a victim. These perspectives, and the Protestant fear of the Devil, began the accusation of people being witches. ...read more.

Conclusion

Martin Luther preached that; ' We are all subject to the devil, both in body and goods' and 'liveth, yea and reigneth throughout the whole world'. Also, for Jean Calvin, the devil was 'so strong and persuasive that the true Christian saint had to engage in an unceasing struggle against him'. This created great fear in normal people who would believe what Martin Luther and Jean Calvin were teaching them, because they and their disciples founded an active, preaching ministry, capable of reaching large numbers of people. People would believe that the devil was absolutely everywhere, and with the new Protestant faith and without Catholic rituals, they could not defeat him. In conclusion, both Levack and Oldridge support the idea that the Reformation led to a more profound fear of the Devil. They both mention similar reasons why it did, but Levack mentions more about Catholicism. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Northern Ireland 1965-85 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Northern Ireland 1965-85 essays

  1. Ireland - Modern World Study

    This was 'gerrymandering'. The results of gerrymandering meant that Unionist councils favoured Protestants over employment and the allocation of council housing. Over the years, it became clear to the Catholics in Northern Ireland that they would not be able to have better living conditions.

  2. Ireland - What are the main differences between the beliefs of the Republicans/Nationalists and ...

    Home Rule was rejected in Parliament in 1886 and 1893, but if anything this just made Nationalist feeling stronger. In 1912, due to pressure from Nationalist MPs, the Home Rule Act was passed. This angered the Unionists greatly and they did not accept the new law.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work