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Doomed to failure from the start. How far do you agree with this assessment of the Provisional Governments chances in 1917?

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Introduction

?Doomed to failure from the start.? How far do you agree with this assessment of the Provisional Government?s chances in 1917? The provisional government was set up in March 1917, due to the failure of the Romanovs. After such a long and unsuccessful leadership with Nicolas II. It was exceptionally hard shoes to fill. However, there were more problems to be seen. The establishment of the Petrograd Soviet meant that the Provisional Government was doomed to failure because they were being undermined. The Petrograd Soviet was made up of soldiers, sailors and workers. Together they wanted to be treated fairly, the end of the war and the elections; which were 9 months away, to be brought forward. ...read more.

Middle

The continuation of the war and the June Offensive meant that the Provisional Government was doomed to failure because they once again lost support of the people. After the Provisional Government refused to pull out of the war. Many major companies such as army armouries and rationings companies went on strike, due to the rash decision of the Government. Many Russian troops refused to fight and just sat in the trenches until being forced to pull back from being under attack from the Austrians. This defeat in the war was blamed instantly on the Provisional Government, leaving them exposed and embarrassing them, when it wasn?t necessarily their fault. Kerensky?s handling of the Kornilov Affair meant that the Provisional Government was doomed to failure from the start because it showed how weak the Provisional ...read more.

Conclusion

The attempt to reform Russia suggests that the Provisional Government was not necessarily doomed to failure from the start because it gained the public?s support. The Government promoted freedom of speech and religion. They promised an elected parliament, which gained the support of many, as they felt they didn?t have a say in political matters. They also introduced an eight-hour day for industrial workers, putting an end to many complaints. They began resolving the trade union and abolished the secret police. This began to win over the support they so needed. Therefore, I feel the statement, ?Doomed to failure from the start,? is harsh, I felt the Provisional Government if been given more time, could have achieved a lot more. They were beginning to win over the nation as well. However, the Government never really had full control over the nation and some laws were not taken seriously. ...read more.

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