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Essay Plan. How was Hitler able to achieve power in 1933?

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Introduction

Mary Waters How was Hitler able to achieve power in 1933? In the years leading up to 1933, Germany was filled with unsureness and with a lack of confidence amongst the German people, causing them to search for new solutions and new leaders. It was circumstances such as the failure of the Weimar Republic and the economic depression of 1929 that forced people to search to the extreme of the political spectrum, either to the extreme left or the extreme right. Hitler and his Nazi Party offered solutions to the political, economic and social dilemmas which appealed to the majority of the German population in a rigorously conducted campaign. The political instability and lack of constitution in the Weimar Republic was one of the key factors that allowed Hitler to achieve power. Weakness of Weimar in its inability to provide a stable government Discredit of democracy with the failure of the Weimar political system Hatred of Treaty of Versailles and the guilt clause Republic associated with the hated T.O.V ï symbol of shame and defeat, until Hitler erased provisions after ‘34 Humiliation of ...read more.

Middle

Production slowed and unemployment began to rise. US banks recalled their loans, which left Germany with no money. Number of unemployed soared to over six million Hitler and other leaders attacked the weaknesses and inefficiency of the government, the divided political parties, the threat of communism and the social and economic consequences of the depression Hitler carried a message of hope and recovery to the German people. Appealed to the middle class During the crisis, people wanted someone to blame and looked to extreme solutions- Hitler gave them both. Nazi representation in the Reichstag rose from 12 in 1928 to receiving 37.4 percent of the vote in July 1932. Divisiveness of political parties on the left between the KPD and the SPD. Hitler’s great skill as an orator and his brilliant thinking and strategy allowed for his rise to power in 1933, appealing to different aspects of the uncertain German population. Movement displayed great skill in playing on a variety of emotions and appealing to particular groups Many in rural Germany ï promise of agrarian reform Unemployed ï promise of relief Army ï promise ...read more.

Conclusion

They all underestimated both Hitler and his movement Conservatives did not support the concept of parliamentary democracy and sought to use the strength and appeal of Hitler?s movement to entrench their own authority and power. Did not want or expect triumph of Nazism. The Nazi party was losing support in 1932 Economy was showing signs of recovery and the threat from the communists was never great and the threat of the army was out of the question. If the army had been called upon it would have supported Hindenburg and not Hitler however the miscalculation of Hitler and his movement meant that he was summoned by his opponents and given the chancellorship. ?His adversaries were the ones to make it possible.? J. Fest The Nazi rise to power took place for many reasons, most notably that Hitler and the Nazi party greatly appealed to the German people by providing them with hope and the promise of a stable government, with a campaign designed to exploit all weaknesses within the German government. Their policies were heavily supported by many, inclusive of the removal of the Treaty of Versailles, a stable government, opportunities for employment and the appeal of Hitler as a leader himself. ...read more.

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