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Evacuation in Britain Sources Questions

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Introduction

Julie Longmore 14th February 2002 GCSE History Coursework 1 'Evacuation in Britain' 1) Source B does seem to support the statement that evacuees were excited about leaving home as it shows children and adults smiling, however it is not a very clear photograph and is difficult to interpret and therefore is not very useful. Source B is also not very reliable. This is because although the photograph was supposedly taken while the evacuees were walking to the station, we don't actually know this, as the picture does not show us that. We also don't even know whether the people in the picture were evacuees, other than the fact that the picture shows them with gas masks around their necks. Although it is a primary source, we don't know who took the photograph, it may have been taken by the Government as part of a propaganda campaign to show the excitement of evacuation. Source 8 (A3 booklet, page4) contradicts source B as it shows children were supposedly unhappy about evacuation. However, source 10 (A3 booklet, page4) supports source B. Source C seems to contradict source B as it gives statements such as 'children were too afraid to talk' 'Mothers weren't allowed with us' Source C is fairly useful as it does tell us what we want to know. ...read more.

Middle

The difference in class meant that both parties had to adjust to their new life. Source E is supported by source A, as source A also talks about the evacuee's bad manners. Source F was from an interview by a middle class evacuee from the city, who we assume from what she says that she was living with a working class family from the countryside. Source F doesn't really contradict source E but just puts across the situation from a different perspective in that she was the one who had the cultural shock not the host as it appeared in source E. Source 8E (A3 booklet, page 1) supports source F as it talks about the assumption made by hosts and villagers that all evacuees came from slums in London. The host from source E would have had a different reason for taking in an evacuee to the host of the evacuee from source F. The host from source E would have probably agreed to having a evacuee out of duty or pity and not because of the money, whereas the host of the evacuee in source F would have been a lot less wealthy and therefore could have agreed to having an evacuee because of the fact that hosts got paid money, or because the evacuee could be used for work, source 14 (A3 booklet) ...read more.

Conclusion

They had the reassurance that their children were away from the bombing of the cities, however they obviously missed their children and often didn't know where there children had been evacuated to, knowing that the evacuation could take up to 6 years. Source 8c (A3 booklet, page 1) supports the fact that parents were sad to send their children away. The Government obviously thought evacuation to be successful to a certain extent as it helped to save peoples lives, especially children. However the time between September 1939 and the middle of 1940, no air attacks took place, therefore some parents brought their children home, back to the cities as they thought nothing was going to happen and they would be safe. Most of those children did not return to the countryside and therefore were in the cities when the air attacks did take place. The Government tried to persuade parents not to do this with posters such as source 19 (A3 booklet, page 5). This was obviously the unsuccessful part of evacuation. Overall I believe evacuation was successful, source 'evacuation' (A3 booklet, page 1) also agrees with me, even though it did not go smoothly, as I said previously it changed the way people in the country saw each other. A source on page 6 (A3 booklet) also supports this- "One half of Britain is at least learning how the other half lives". ...read more.

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