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Events leading to the end of the Tsarist Russia and the 1917 Revolution

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Introduction

Events leading to the end of the Tsarist Russia and the 1917 Revolution Russian history has provided us with the knowledge that whenever a threat of war looms the majority of the nation abandons its disagreement in an act of unity and show of patriotisms. This sort of enthusiasm was evident in the period we are studying, this sort of enthusiasm thereby makes the leaders more popular, but such is the backwardness of Russia at the time that the wave of support never lasted the mismatch between Russia and its enemies were laughable. For such a huge country with enormous factors of production at its disposal, the fact that Russia was never able to maximise its potential is a major factor behind the down fall of the Romanov Dynasty. The real revolution occurred in 1917, but the first sign of popular discontent started emerging in the turn during the turn of the 20th century, during that period, agricultural depression, effect of industrialisation and the heavy handing of the Tsar started to evoke radicalism both in the towns and countryside, but these groups were dealt with but the okrana. Since the Tsar ruled autocratically, where he had total say and control over everything that occurred, he has to take responsibility for Russia's defeat during the Russo-Japanese war in which Russian soldiers were so ill equipped, ill disciplined and overall, poorly managed, it is one thing to divert attention ...read more.

Middle

When goods are in short supply, their prices spiral put of control and unless wages can keep up, which in itself increases cost of production, the public will find it hard to survive, increasing German army advances into Russia resulted in peasants fleeing into the cities thereby causing overcrowding and added to the strains of a densely populated area already witnessing food shortages for example, between 1914 and 1917, Petrograd population grew from 2.1 million to 2.7 million. The length of the war also resulted in shortages in raw materials and some factory started to close down and this caused mass unemployment, this combined with the bad weather, food shortages, overcrowding, humiliation abroad, high inflation, wages not keeping up, Russia was in chaos. All these factors combined amongst other to create the down fall of the tsar, one other factor was his persistent on autocracy when logic would have said otherwise. The patriotic formation of bodies such as the Union of Zemstva to provide medical facilities and the Congress of Representatives of Industry and Trade to coordinate production raised an old thorny question. How far should these groups be able to influence the war since the tsar was meant to be the sole operator? The tsar was unwilling to rescinded or share his power so these group, radical or not, where denied active roles in the conduct of the war. ...read more.

Conclusion

N. Sukhanov, a socialist observer, "not one party was preparing for the great overturn". Realising the seriousness of the situation, the tsar tried to return home but his train was stopped outside the city and his general, Rodzianko adviced him to abdicate. Under orders from the tsar, the Dumas dispersed but transformed themselves into a provisional government and most of the members supported the general advice but only in the hopes of retaining the monarchy under a more popular, constitutional tsar, having originally dismissed the Dumas pleas for last ditch reforms, Nicholas then toyed with the idea of a military assault upon his own capital. He was dissuaded by the pleas of his more trusted generals who wanted constitutional reform, but Nicholas was unable to compromise his own autocracy and agreed to abdicate on 15 March, the following day, his brother Mikhail, refused the crown leaving Russia a republic after 304 years of Romanov rule. What followed was anarchy with the revolution becoming one against authority and private property, and the provisional government found it hard to fight a war abroad and contain chaos at home. Lenin and Trotsky saw their chance and in the name of the soviets and an implied a socialist coalition, they seized power in oct/nov 1917 and on the orders of the bolsheviks, the royal family was killed in July 1918 and communist Russia began. ...read more.

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