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Examine the aims and assess the results of the attempts by the Nazi regime to transform German society?

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Introduction

Examine the aims and assess the results of the attempts by the Nazi regime to transform German society? When the Nazis came to power in 1933 they began to introduce a set of ideas into the German society. These ideas were based on the Nazi ideology, which had been outlined by Hitler in his book "Mein Kampf" or "My Struggle" a few years earlier. This essay will examine the Nazis' attempts to integrate their ideological beliefs about youth and about women into the German society. The essay will also assess the success of this integration. The Nazis had a number of different aims for the youth and therefore their education needed to be suitable. The Nazis' overall aim was to create a generation of racially pure Germans who were ready to serve their country. Therefore it was necessary to mould physically strong young boys who were prepared for war. This meant that their teaching emphasis was upon military values and all their lessons had a military slant. Young German girls were encouraged to become child bearing and home keeping women. This Nazi ideal revolved around the policy of the three K's Kinder, Kuche und Kirche (Children, Kitchen, Church). This ideological belief will be discussed later in this essay in relation to the Nazi views of women. The Nazis' method for achieving this task was the forced membership of the Bund deutscher M�del (BdM) the League of German Maidens. This was a youth organisation run by the Nazis to promote their views. The German youth during the Nazi reign was also encouraged to be anti-Semitic. This was also taught in the German schools and through the German youth organisations mentioned earlier. ...read more.

Middle

Also the birth rate within Germany did increase over the level it had been during the depression yet it did not return to the level it was at in Weimar Germany. In respect to the Nazi policies involving marriage the results were mainly positive with the number of marriages increasing from 516,000 in 1933 to 740,000 in 1934. However the increased number of divorces contrasted this. Again the increase in marriage may have been due to the increased economic optimism among the population rather than the Nazi policies. The development of the German welfare state, which encouraged the development of healthy German women, was a success with the reduction in infant mortality from 7.7% in 1933 to 6.6% in 1936. The aims of the Nazis to reduce the number of women in employment were in direct conflict with the successful running of the country. On one hand the Nazis were attempting to pursue their ideological beliefs by removing women from employment. On the other hand the war demanded that women be used as labour in factories to help with the war effort as they were the most suitable source of labour. The overall impact of the Nazi policies to the female population was marginal with the biggest impact being felt in the professions as women were forced out of the higher powered jobs. The effect of the Nazi policies regarding women's participation in public life was mixed. Women did gain an increased voice in society through their organisations however this voice always had a Nazi slant to it due to their control of the organisation. However there was a negative side to the increased participation as women became more excluded from the overall decision making process. ...read more.

Conclusion

In biology you would have found out how, as an Aryan, you were a superior person. More intelligent, stronger, faster, better all round. In maths you would have done sums to do with artillery ranges ect. By the end of your schooling you would be completely convinced that believing in Hitler was the right thing to do. As well as school children were encouraged and then forced to join the Hitler Youth or League of Maidens. These were the only youth organistions as all the others were banned. For boys this consisted of learning skills for war (marching sleeping outdoors looking after a rifle ect) and learning loyalty to Hitler. For girls in the League of Maidens this would have consisted of learning to keep an efficient household and "women's work". By doing this the Nazis explained that a new Aryan race would shine through and become the dominant race above the sub humans. They would achieve this by going to war, the boys would grow up in to brilliant fighting units where as the girls would be around for baby making for more "fighting units". What the Hitler youth was was a training camp for the "Aryan" race. For example if there is a race between two people and one of them does lots of training while the other is not allowed to train then the one that has had the training will probably win. As time went on more and more youths stoped going to the hitler youth organisations and eventually it became the in thing to do. These people would listen to banned music and sing English or American songs.Nazi Germany was a very male dominated socity (the Nazi views that a womens place was at the home bringing up children). So all the important jobs went to men. ...read more.

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