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Explain how Blacks disagreed amongst themselves in the 1960s about the best way to try to gain more civil rights.

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Introduction

History coursework Explain how Blacks disagreed amongst themselves in the 1960s about the best way to try to gain more civil rights. Black people had many organisations that were designed to challenge segregation and to try and gain more civil rights. For example, one of these organisations include the NAACP (The national Association for the Advancement of Coloured People).They believed that they could undermine the legal foundations of southern segregationist practices , but the strategy worked only when Blacks, acting individually or in small groups, assumed the risks associated with crossing the racial barriers. The NAACP was set up in 1909-1910 in New York City by a group of White and Black intellectuals. They sought to make the Whites aware of the need of racial equality. They launched a program of speechmaking, lobbying and publicizing such issues, to attack segregation and racial inequality through the courts. ...read more.

Middle

This prompted President John F. Kennedy to push for passage of new civil rights legislation. The group played a large part in the freedom rides aimed at desegregating buses and in the marches organized by Martin. L. King and SCLC. They also did Black voter campaigns in the South. Three of its members died at the hands of the KKK during the Mississippi Freedom summer of 1964. Events such as these highlighted divisions between King and the SNCC. In 1996, Stokely Carmichael was elected head of the SNCC and popularised the term black power to characterize the new tactics and goals which include - Black self reliance and the use of violence as a legitimate means of self defence. Black power is an umbrella term used to describe the more militant aspects of the late 1960s civil rights movement. ...read more.

Conclusion

Although Black power advocates achieved only a few of their goals, the idea remained a powerful one in modern Black America. Amzie Moore and Fannie Lou Hamer were among the grass roots leaders who worked closely with SNCC to build new organisations, such as the MFDP (Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party). It attracted national attention and thus prepared the way for a major upsurge in southern Black political activity. SNCC organizers worked with local leaders in Alabama to create the Lowndes county freedom organisation. The symbol they chose - The Black Panther- reflected the radicalism and belief in racial separatism that increasingly characterised SNCC during the last half of the 1960's. The Black panther symbol was later adopted by the California based black panther party, formed in 1966 by Huey Newton and bobby Seale. The SNCC was a non-violent organisation whose policies contradicted the views of the Black panther party who believed that violence was acceptable in the struggle for freedom. They definitely had different views on how equality should be gained. ...read more.

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