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Explain how India's campaign for independence changed as a result of World War 1?

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Introduction

4th October 2003 Explain how India's campaign for independence changed as a result of World War 1? The First World War had a huge impact upon relations between Britain and India. India's campaign for independence had become more confident and well supported by the end of the war. Some of the reasons for this change were the creations of the Home rule and the Lucknow Pact, and unpopular reforms such as the Rowlatt Acts and the government of India Acts 1919. To start however, it's important to look at India's actual contribution during the war India's contribution to the war was by giving 1.25 million Indians who volunteered to fight the war. India also helped by giving cotton and other raw materials when it was needed therefore the Indians suspected they may win mighty changes from the Indian government. ...read more.

Middle

The British thought the Indians wanted something in return so they introduced two houses for India. About five million of the wealthiest Indians were given the right to vote (a very small percentage (2.8%) of the total population).Within the Indian government, minister of education, health and public works could now be Indians National. The Indians Increased in their hopes so on 20th August 1917 Sir Montagu the secretary of India. This was for Indian to have more say as the Viceroy; Lord Chelmsford toured India in 1917-18 to listen to the local peoples opinions. The war lead to lot of food shortages and price rising, so this lead to outbreaks and violence's which was most serious in Punjab so the Indians were in charge of arresting without trial and Jury this was called the Rowlatt Acts were formed. ...read more.

Conclusion

However poor crop yields, which contributed to the deaths of many Indians between 1918-1919, prompted England to pass the Rowlatt Acts, which allowed the government to punish dissenters and rabble-rousers without the use of juries (indeed, sometimes even without trials). Such an act of Imperialistic tyranny spurned much anti-British sentiment in the twenties and thirties, the most famous example being Mahandas Gandhi's organization of passive-resistance campaigns. While the efforts of Gandhi and his followers did effect swift political change (The Government of India Act was passed later in 1919), the marginal increase in India's provision for self-rule did not satisfy those who had been disenchanted with the destructive force of England's colonization. In addition to the actions of Mahandas Gandhi the Indians began to reshape the view that many Indians took concerning there role in the "British Empire." ...read more.

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