• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Explain how the mobile warfare of August 1914 had become the Western Front by the end of the year.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Explain how the mobile warfare of August 1914 had become the Western Front by the end of the year. Provide why and how... Talk bout how Schlieffen plan Race to the sea Battle of Marne formation of frontline and 1914 Talk bout stalemate The mobile warfare of August 1914 became the western front by the end of the year due to false expectations and lost control of events leading up to stalemate. When war broke out in august 1914 there was a feeling across the whole of Europe that it would be all over by Christmas. The public never contemplated establishing defensive positions or that they might have to hold them for years. Military leaders were aware of the possible magnitude of future warfare and the reality of the scale of the modern warfare merely reinforced the idea of the need to get in first and achieve the knockout blow. They faith in the idea of the knockout blow and the importance of speed and mobility was held by all military leaders across the globe which lead to the formulation of complex mobilisation plans. ...read more.

Middle

The reason the Germans believed this is because of the closer proximity of France and the technological inferiority of Russia. As early as 1899, Schlieffen had developed a plan of attack against France. Schlieffen realized that Germany could not attack straight across their border due to the fortresses, which France had built along Alsace and Lorraine after 1870. Therefore, at the heart of Schlieffen plan was the idea that Germany would have to attack France by first going through Belgium. Because Belgium had been neutral since 1839, it was assumed to be an easy target, which would provide the Germans with quick access into France. Additionally, Schlieffen predicted that France would eventually attack through Belgium, so Germany might as well do so first. Although Schlieffen died in 1912, Germany still used his plan when the war broke in 1914. As executed with certain modifications in the fall of 1914, the plan at first seemed likely to succeed. The swift German incursion into Belgium at the beginning of August routed the Belgian army, which abandoned the strongholds of Li�ge and Namur and took safety in the fortress of Antwerp. ...read more.

Conclusion

The French pressure on the German right flank caused the retreat of Kluck's army and then a general retreat of all the German forces to the Aisne River. These errors (which were sanctioned by General Headquarters) cost the Germans any further progress and they withdrew back to safe positions north of the Marne River, where they resisted attempts by the French to dislodge them. The German commander, General Erich Von Falkenhayn, decided that his troops must hold onto those parts of France and Belgium that Germany still occupied. Falkenhayn ordered his men to dig trenches that would provide them with protection from the advancing French and British troops. The Allies soon realised that they could not break through this line and they also began to dig trenches. After a few months these trenches had spread from the North Sea to the Swiss Frontier. For the next three years neither side advanced more than a few miles along this line that became known as the Western Front resulting in stalemate. The fault lay not only with Kluck, but also with the German Commander-in-Chief, Count Helmut von Molkte and probably with the Schlieffen plan itself, which failed to account for the limitations of infantry formations operating at such rapid tempos. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE International relations 1900-1939 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE International relations 1900-1939 essays

  1. Trench Warfare between 1914-17

    The French and their allies did not want position to be permanent and they built less defensive trenches and also a favoured tactic was to bombard the opposing lines for several days before an attack was due to start, with the aim of destroying the enemy's moral.

  2. Trench warfare. Trench warfare was created to help hold your position and fend ...

    water and mud that would fill in the trenches if not kept out. Poison gas and highly explosive shells were used to attack trenches, also the hand grenade that was already created at this time was used to attack trenches.

  1. Why Did A Stalemate Develop On The Western Front?

    However, entrenching left the diggers exposed above ground and hence could only be carried out when free of observation such as in a rear area or at night. Sapping involved extending the trench by digging away at the end face.

  2. History Year 11 Dunkirk

    It only shows one scene, and straight after the photo was taken, something could have happened to change the meaning of this image. Overall, source B works alongside Taylor's statement. It is equal for both sides, in that it shows one aspect of which it could be seen as deliverance, and one of disaster.

  1. Why did the Germans fail to achieve victory in the West in 1914? Source ...

    dictated that the troops were to go very much nearer the estuary. Additionally, it ordered that the armies encircling Paris to cross the River Oise, a tributary of the River Seine, however, Moltke disagreed, and, in his amendments of the Schlieffen Plan in 1911, care of Source B, he ordered

  2. Was there much change in the fighting methods employed by the British Army on ...

    there was prevalence of shrapnel, which was which was designed to wipe out troops that were in the open rather than being effective against trenches. However, by 1916 the situation had changed drastically and at the Battle of the Somme the 3rd army alone was allocated 3 million rounds.

  1. Why did the First World War break out in August 1914?

    The result of this being the countries were able to utilise the continent?s resources which benefited industry and commerce in their own countries. It also involved negative consequences as during the process, relations with other countries would become strained and this would then lead to disputes.

  2. Was Field Marshall Douglas Haig more important that the allied blockade of German naval ...

    At 4:55am on the densely foggy morning of Wednesday 21 August, infantry of 5 divisions, advanced on a 7 mile front in the wake of a precise creeping barrage, completely surprising the enemy. VI corpse gained its objective by 5:40am; IV corpse facing resistance took its first objective 20 minutes later.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work