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Explain the changes in the status and position of European Jews between 1880 and 1920.

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Introduction

Explain the changes in the status and position of European Jews between 1880 and 1920 Anti Semitism in Europe was very established in Europe, as from the medieval period, Jews were seen as Christ killers. Anti Semitism was religious discrimination, but in the period we are studying, this changed into racial discrimination. In the late nineteenth century, Jews in France and Germany were treated fairly. The French Revolution in 1789 emancipated French Jews, and German Jews were emancipated through the Reich, when Germany was unified in 1870. In both countries, the Jewish people were assimilated. Jews in these countries were native spoken, so they did not stand out from locals. This situation in Germany and France was very different to in Russia. Russian Jews were restricted to living in the 'Pale', which was in Poland and Ukraine. Only some escaped living in the 'Pale', professionals who were useful for Russians, doctors, dentists and Pharmacists. ...read more.

Middle

The Russians liked this idea, as the Jews were leaving their country to go somewhere else. They saw France and Germany as being not Anti Semitic, and thought that their lives would be better in these countries. This was not the case. In France and in Germany, Jews were assimilated. Jews were not distinguishable from ordinary natives. The Jews that moved into these countries were Orthodox Jews who did not speak the native language. This made the Jews stick out. Anti Semitism increased, as the Jews did not try to fit in. When something went wrong, they stood out and were easy to target as scapegoats. At this time in France and also in Germany, there was a period of serious economic depression. The immigrants fit people's popular stereotypes, this proved their point, and gradually Anti Semitism was increasing in Europe at this time. ...read more.

Conclusion

In 1917 was the first of the Revolutions in Russia. A provisional Government ruled Russia they emancipated all Jews, and all discriminatory laws were repealed. The Jews were now joyous, as this was what they had been waiting for. The Weimar Republic treated Jews as before the War. They remained full citizens and some still served at highest levels, Hugo Preuss was the Interior Minister and he drafted the Constitution. The Treaty of Versailles increased some Anti Semitism in Germany, and as the Germans had to accept War Guilt, this was passed onto Jews. There was not that much Anti Semitism, it was still only on the fringes of society, but it was still visible. The Treaty of Versailles created Poland; their Government was Anti Semitic. The Atheist state of Poland discouraged all religions. By the end of this period in France, Jews were treated averagely in France; Anti Semitic undercurrents remained, mainly in army and diplomatic areas. Word Count - 800 words Edward Amoroso ...read more.

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