• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Explain the nature and purpose of the 'Hitler Youth' movement.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Year 11 Coursework- Autumn Term Assignment 1- Nazi Germany Candidate 7214 (a) Explain the nature and purpose of the 'Hitler Youth' movement. The Hitler youth movement was a reasonable addition to Hitler's belief that the future of Nazi Germany relied on its children. Hitler used the naivety, vulnerability and easily influenced youth of Germany to be directly involved with his efforts to generate his superior German race. From the very beginning of his rule Hitler made it very clear of what he expected German children to be like, he wanted '... young men and women who can suffer pain', and 'A young German must be swift as a greyhound, as tough as leather, and as hard as Krupp's steel'. Hitler wanted total control over the minds of the young in Nazi Germany, even more than was already present. After Hitler came to power all other youth organisations were abolished and because of this, the number of members in the Hitler Youth was quickly increased. In 1933 its members stood at 100 000, but by 1936 the figure had largely improved to 4 million members, and in the same year it became compulsory to join the Hitler Youth. They catered for 10 to 18 year olds, both male and female, but there were separate organisation for boys and girls, and the purpose of these two organisations was exceptionally different. In order for a child to join these groups they needed to have the proof that they were from pure German blood, therefore they had to outline their family tree as far back as possible. ...read more.

Middle

Hitler wanted to undoubtedly build up the master race and therefore came to the conclusion that women should be sacked from the jobs and commit their lives to the three K's ' kinder, kuche, kirche' ('children, kitchen and church'). One of the pillars of the Nazi thinking was developing pure race Aryans and so a policy introduced was that women could only marry purely racial men because this would lead to Aryan babies to be created and therefore was largely encouraged, even if the women were not married. Hitler also supposed that if women became house wives and were at home when soldiers came back from the upcoming war they would create social security for them leading to content cared for returns thus raising their spirits and making them happy to return. All of these policies stood towards women because Hitler believed in the ideological view of a woman's role. The Nazis wanted to fulfil some of their objectives such as a racially pure Germany, a '1000 year Reich', more soldiers and mothers, a more powerful Germany and lebensraum, and all these mainly revolved around the next generation of Germany which would solitarily come about by women becoming mothers. Consequently the Nazis needed to introduce all these policies towards women to enslave them into revolving their lives around their husbands, children and homes. As well as playing as integral part in achieving this goal, Hitler believed it did not stop there, but not only did women have to have children they also had to bring them up in the most National Socialist way. ...read more.

Conclusion

The only group that openly opposed the Nazis was the minority belonging to the churches; however nothing could be done to stop them as Hitler was in no way willing to risk loosing millions of religious people's support. The underground opposition of the Nazis was widely spread as people undoubtedly preferred to oppose the Nazi regime secretively rather that having a risk of getting killed. People even organised an operation to send leaflets through letters boxes to addresses chosen at random from directories. They did this 'passive resistance' at night in order to greatly reduce there chances of getting caught. There was also an open opposition coming from the Jews and gypsies after Hitler's opinion of them was made clear, but these groups were dealt with by genocide actions. To conclude I believe the most important reason why there was little opposition in Nazi Germany, was due to both propaganda and fear. Propaganda successfully worked as it operated on such a large scale. Ruling every part of human livelihood such as the media made it exceptionally difficult to disregard anything that was being said and forming your own opinion was not easy. The chance of getting killed or having to live through ongoing suffering in a concentration camp was something that people obviously tried to avoid. So, there was a lot of opposition of the Nazi regime but all on an underground, secretive level. There was no organised antagonism due to the trepidation of the Gestapo and SS and thus a very small known minority openly opposed the Nazi regime. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Germany 1918-1939 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Germany 1918-1939 essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    The main purpose of the Nazi curriculum was to prepare boys to be soldiers. ...

    4 star(s)

    This was mainly to ensure that boys would be healthy enough to join the armed forces. All students had to take a physical examination. If they failed this examination, they may be expelled. The threat of expulsion reduced the amount of students who would give minimal effort to the subject.

  2. Explain the nature and the purposee of the Hitler Youth Movement

    Maths They would be working out questions about the amount of Zyclon Gas used to kill people and how much they would need to kill 37 people. Health Biology Become fit and healthy Nazis. Ideology To understand about the perfect race, the ideal race with ideal politics.

  1. The Nature and Purpose of the Hitler Youth Movement

    There was then a typically elaborate introduction ceremony on the F�herer's birthday. The Hitler Youth was not just a German version of the Boy Scouts. The Hitler Youth were more similar to the Soviet Young Pioneers, but even with the Pioneers there were major differences.

  2. Explain the nature and purpose of the 'Hitler movement'

    He achieved this this extremely well through the movement's meetings. Hitler wanted boys to become patriotic, bold and tough fighting machines, the boys were trained for army and war life for example camping and marching ect. and to become strong fighters for their country in later life by the intense physical training they had to endure.

  1. GCSE Coursework Assignment 2

    Because the Nazis disliked the Jews they used propaganda to make Germans hate them, and many Nazi followers listened to the propaganda. It is also true that the Nazis mistreated the Jews, as they campaigned against them by telling them that they were not welcome in certain places, and later

  2. Profile on the 5 leading Nazi's

    He also suffered from obesity and weighed 280 pounds. In 1927 President Paul von Hindenburg granted Goering an amnesty and he returned to Berlin. The following year he was one of the twelve members of the Nazi Party elected to the Reichstag and on 30th August, 1932, became its president.

  1. Hitler - WHAT WAS THE PURPOSE OF THE FINIAL SOLUTION?

    Source A states that Hitler said "I must get rid of the Jews they are an element of revolt". This is supported by a Nazi propaganda campaign in which the Jews were compared to rats. Source A suggests that Hitler only dared what was feasible at the time.

  2. adolf hitler

    People began to say that if he was clever enough to predict the depression maybe he also knew how to solve it. In the General Election that took place in September 1930, the Nazi Party increased its number of representatives in parliament from 14 to 107.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work