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Explain the reason why the Jews were persecuted in Nazi Germany in the years 1933-1945?

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Introduction

Explain the reason why the Jews were persecuted in Nazi Germany in the years 1933-1945? Before the year 1933, Adolf Hitler had been jailed for his involvement in the Munich putsch. During his time in prison he wrote the book "Mein Kampf" meaning "My Struggle". In this book he expressed his beliefs and views on other religions and he explained how he wanted to "cleanse Germany of all non Aryan elements", mainly meaning the Jews. He was released from prison early and became involved in the government. After the failure of the Weimar republic the German people became more interested in extremist parties such as the communists and the Nazis. The Nazis were lead by Hitler and as the Weimar republic became more and more unpopular, they were becoming more and more popular. The Nazis finally came into power in 1933 and Hitler became chancellor, it took the Nazis only three months to put their program of anti-Semitism into effect. This was where the status and position of Jews in Germany began to worsen. ...read more.

Middle

The Nazis tried to keep their anti-Semitic campaign reasonable so they wouldn't be accused of being brutal. They did this by using propaganda to support their claims. Goebbels did everything he could to spread Jew hatred. He used posters, cartoons, and film clips, radio programs, placards and "Der Strummer" to spread anti-Semitism in Germany. This was done to make the everyday man think that it was natural to hate Jewish people. The propaganda continued ant the pictures printed of Jewish people were of orthodox Jews that were more recognisable. By 1935, life was intolerable for German Jews and they were under constant threat of abuse, terror and isolation. In September 1935 the status and position of Jews in Germany took a drastic turn for the worst. This is because the Nuremburg laws were passed. This stripped Jewish people of all their rights as German citizens. The Nuremburg laws also forced Jewish men to add "Israel" to their first names and forced women to add " Sara" to their first names. ...read more.

Conclusion

This was the brutal murder of all Jews in Europe in Nazi territory. The Nazis said it was the "final solution" and it was where all Jews in Europe would be wiped out. It was the worst time for Jews in Germany and it lead to millions of deaths. The status and position of Jews in Germany worsened from 1933-1945 because of one evil man, Adolf Hitler. If he had not been released from prison and become chancellor, the status of Jewish people would have probably been the same. Hitler came to power because after world war one, Germany was in a crisis and the people started to look for alternatives. Hitler was a great public speaker and he told people what they wanted to hear. When he was running for chancellor his policies on Jewish people had already been brought up so the Germans knew what he would do if he came into power. They believed in Hitler and they thought he was right. He was so anti-Semitic, that he managed to turn a whole country and make them believe he was right. Hitler concentrated on making Jewish people seem inferior and used all types of propaganda to convince the people he was correct. Created by terence.findlay ...read more.

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