• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Explain why by 1928, the Soviet leadership had decided on collectivisation of agriculture?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Explain why by 1928, the Soviet leadership had decided on collectivisation of agriculture? Stalin at the forefront of Soviet leadership decided by 1928 to push forwards his plans of collectivisation and rapid industrialisation to ultimately cement his credibility as a leader, and to discredit his many Bukharite opponents on the far right within the party. He also pushed forward collectivisation to deal with the issue of feeding his workers who where his key/natural supporters who Stalin felt needed this boost from the rural areas in order to, as he hoped catch up with the industrial output of the U.S.A within 10 years. ...read more.

Middle

Stalin's economic aims where to improve efficiency and production of farms. He achieved this by merging small scale peasant farms with those of the larger mechanised socialist farms (Kolkhoz) and the gargantuan state farms (Sovkhoz). He also wanted to maintain a higher provision of seeds tractors and machinery. Stalin made sure that all produce was sold to the state at a fixed price further enforcing communist ideals. ...read more.

Conclusion

Collectivisation eventually further extended Stalin's political grasp of the countryside. Ultimately Stalin managed some progression eg: Motor Tractor Stations, education for the majority of towns, solved the land crisis and solved the needed shift of urban to rural dwellers changing from an agricultural society to an industrial one. However he left the peasants feeling uprooted and bewildered, not only this but by 1939 Soviet agriculture productivity had barely reached its level in 1913. However Stalin's aims where understandable yet perhaps not justifiable (Murder of the Kulaks). ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Russia, USSR 1905-1941 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Russia, USSR 1905-1941 essays

  1. Stalin Coursework - sources explaining collectivisation and its effects.

    farms or embellished the truth about the state in which these farms were in. In addition to this, 'The Communist' was constrained by the Socialist Realism Policy and had to portray Collectivisation as a success in case Stalin found out about his involvement in the construction of the article.

  2. Purges and Hysteria in the Soviet Union

    Stalin reflected on the struggles he had experienced and gave Wells a rationale for his brutality. "But," he said, " I do not forget that many people are evil." Other well-meaning and intelligent people visited the Soviet Union, among them the American singer, actor and human rights advocate Paul Robeson.

  1. 'The Soviet Sate was established at the expense of the Soviet people' Examine the ...

    These were called Stakhanovites after Alexei Stakhanov, the Georgian miner. In 1934 Stakhanov organized his fellow workers to cut 102 tons of coal in a single shift. The target for the shift was just seven tons. Stakhanov became a national hero.

  2. Consider this judgement on the consequences of Stalin's leadership of the Soviet Union 1928 ...

    Under Stalinism, society was controlled and indoctrinated from all possible angles. He developed the 'Cult of Personality' in which pictures and statues of him were placed throughout every town and village, many of which ere named after him. The media was heavily censored with all documents being enforced to follow 'social realism'.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work