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Explain why Soviet & Warsaw pact forces invaded Czechoslovakia in 1968 (12)

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Introduction

Explain why Soviet & Warsaw pact forces invaded Czechoslovakia in 1968 (12) In 1968 Dubcek challenged the communist leadership in Czechoslovakia, and reformed Czechoslovakia?s policies, starting the Prague Spring. This lead to the Soviet and Warsaw pact forces eventually invading Czechoslovakia, due to fears that Czechoslovakia would move away from communism due to legalisation of opposition political groups, less censorship leading to a fear of weakened Soviet rule, and the reform of allowing political criticism. The most important reason for the Soviet and Warsaw pact forces invading Czechoslovakia in 1968 was due to Dubcek?s reforms that lead to the legalisation of opposition political groups. ...read more.

Middle

An implementation of a new government would mean that the USSR would lose one of its satellite states, and have its overall influence on surrounding countries reduced, at the same time increasing the USA?s capitalist influence. The fears of Soviet influence being reduced was increased by the fact that Dubcek?s reforms lead to less censorship in Czechoslovakia, opening the public to media previously not allowed to be seen. The USSR feared that this lack of censorship would lead to the public rejecting communism once they had access to media and were able to be influenced by capitalist ideas. ...read more.

Conclusion

Soviet and Warsaw Pact forces invaded Czechoslovakia in 1968 due to the reforms made by Dubcek in the Prague Spring. The most important reason for the invasion was that the reforms made by Dubcek included the legalisation of opposition political groups, and the USSR feared that by allowing opposition groups there was a chance that Czechoslovakia would leave communism. Other reasons include the fact that censorship was reduced, allowing the public to view and be influenced by negative opinions of communism, leading to fears that the wider public would reject communism. ...read more.

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