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Explain why the attitude of Black people differed on how to achieve racial equality in the USA in the 1960s and the 1970s

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Explain why the attitude of Black people differed on how to achieve racial equality in the USA in the 1960s and the 1970s During the 1960s and 1970s, different black groups had different opinions about how to achieve racial equality. After justifying each point I will link it back to the question. The term 'racial equality' means despite race, people have same rights and opportunities as others. In this assignment I will attempt to explain why the attitude of Black people differed on how to achieve racial equality. The first Civil Rights group I will look at is the NAACP which was lead by Martin Luther King. They believed racial equality could be achieved by peaceful but powerful means, such as protests and lobbying. They believed this was the way to achieve racial equality because peaceful protesting and pressure had achieved so much for them so far. ...read more.


Those who supported the Black Panthers were usually young black students from college and university. These students mostly came from the west and witnessed police brutality and would like to take revenge against the injustice of white police officers. In order to do so, they turned to the Black Panthers. Many riots broke out amongst the police and the Black Panthers which led to many losses of lives. The Black Panthers got their views on independence from Malcolm X. Malcolm X had negative views towards white people. Even from when he was a child he faced racism by a white school teacher. He was told that he could not be a lawyer as he was a black skinned person and then he faced violent attacks from the Ku Klux Klan (KKK). He got into a lot of trouble with the police when he found out about his father's death. ...read more.


Therefore, after realizing the hateful past he had, he accepted the path of peace and non-violence During the 1960s and 1970s some blacks began to think using violence was the way to achieve racial equality because whites only understood violent attacks. They used violence as they were fed up at the lack of progress with the non-violent approach. This was partly due to the failing Civil Rights Act which was not making much progress. After the loss of Martin Luther King, the non-violent approach was less promoted and the two remaining groups capitalized this. They encouraged blacks to defend themselves against violent attacks. In conclusion black people had different opinions on how to achieve racial equality because of the impact that the three major groups had. All of the leaders of the groups were brought up as Christians but had experiences in life which led to them converting their religion. This is seen in Malcolm X and Stokeley Carmichael who became an anti-religion believer. The leaders had major experiences, such as being arrested, which change their views on the use of violence. ...read more.

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