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Explain why woman failed to gain the vote 1900-1914

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Introduction

Explain why woman failed to gain the vote 1900-1914 In the middle of the ninetieth century, very few men had really considered the issue of woman's rights. The status of women in Victorian society was not high and in the terms of legal rights, women were level with children, criminals and lunatics. If a woman was married, her husband owned her property as well as his own. The justification for this state of affairs was that men were said to be the decision makers, who carried the responsibility of supporting a family. One of the big changes caused by the industrial revolution was the growth of the middle class. These people could afford to buy their own homes and afford for their children to be educated and had a very different idea as to the role of women to the working class. ...read more.

Middle

There was a belief that women should give birth to as many babies as possible for the future of the country and the British Empire. People who believed such things were against women getting the vote. We call this belief patriarchy. Queen Victoria was quoted to have said: "With the vote, women would become the most hateful, heartless and disgusting of human beings. Where would be the protection which man was intended to give the weaker sex?" The belief that women should have a large family contributed to the thought at the time that contraception was evil. People 'on the left' in politics were against women getting the vote because, the majority of the women would have voted conservative, and kept the Liberal Democrats and Labour out of power. ...read more.

Conclusion

Finally, it can be argued that women did not get the vote just before the First World War because of the wave of Suffragette terrorism which was taking place all over the United Kingdom 1909-1914. Many men were angry about cut telegraph lines, poisoned reservoirs, and smashed shop windows, and those who might have supported women getting the vote turned against them. In 1913 Emily Davidson, a suffragette, was killed trying to disrupt the Derby. She ran in front of the King's horse and was trampled to death. Many historians believe this final point is the main reason why women did not get the vote. The physical force of the suffragettes and the moral force of the suffragists can be related back to the Chartists when the physical force gave both groups a bad name by the violence of one. ?? ?? ?? ?? Bethan Richards 11AG History Coursework- Mrs Robinson ...read more.

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