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Explain why women failed to gain the vote between 1900 and 1914.

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Introduction

The Suffragettes- Coursework Explain why women failed to gain the vote between 1900 and 1914 During the period of 1900 - 1914, there were various reasons as to why women failed to gain the vote. Traditionally, women were seen as second to men and their position in society was not high. They were seen on a par with criminals and children in terms of legal rights. When a woman married, if she owned any land or property it went directly to her husband, which was also the case if she inherited property or land. If she became a mother she had no legal rights over her children, as they were legally her husbands. If a woman decided to leave and divorce her husband, she lost all her possessions as well as her children. They were intellectual slaves who had no involvement in manual labour and were considered as the inferior sex, vulnerable and emotionally weak in comparison to males during this period. During and towards the end of the nineteenth century, a lot more improvements were made to the status of the working woman. This was due to the fact that the British economy was at a high point and this was why more opportunities arose for women in teaching, shop work, and some clerical/office work. There was a lot more teaching vacancies due to the fact that the government in 1870 passed an education act, which doubled the amount of elementary schools in Britain. ...read more.

Middle

Women were unable to socialise with people as many husbands forbid their wives to do so. This is because they were considered to be intellectually and socially inferior to men. This was also a problem because women didn't no how they could prove to men that they could actually vote intelligently. The political problems women faced were that the liberals thought women would vote Tory or for the up and coming labour party. There was no such thing as female MP's, but many liberal backbenches agreed with the women and their movements. Such leaders as William Gladstone who said, "only the better off women would get the vote" but in fact the truth was that the main leaders were worried that the women would vote against them and their party. On the other hand they were interested in the women's fight for suffrage indicating their socialist attitudes towards the situation. The political reason for this is that the two main powers both had different interpretations of woman's suffrage. Some were strictly opposed to the argument where as others were unsure, and didn't really no what to think about situations as this. The biggest problem, which arose as to why women failed to get the vote, was that men were too selfish, scared and unsure whether to let women have a chance of proving themselves and their individual capabilities. ...read more.

Conclusion

Eventually, Cristobel Pankhurst called for the Suffragettes and the suffragists to join hands and 'all fight on one front.' Unfortunately this didn't happen as there was still rivalry remaining between the two campaigning organisations On the whole, the main reasons why women didn't get the vote between 1900 - 1914 were because of the violent and disruptive methods of the Suffragettes. Which unquestionably changed the views and attitudes that men had of women. The behaviour of the suffragettes portrayed that women were untrustworthy and irresponsible and also a danger to others in society. The suffragette's actions were a step to far and certainly stunned the Government and society in general. The downside of the suffragette's movements was that the women could have voted intellectually and the violence was not needed. However there were other long-term factors like political reasons and social reasons. Overall, it was such a male dominated society that women were never given a chance to prove their potential and usefulness. If the women had been given a chance from the beginning a lot of problems would never have occurred. They would have also proved a lot to the men. If the Suffragists and the Suffragettes had joined and worked together on the campaigns, the outcome would have been more effective and they may have unquestionably achieved the vote a long time before they actually did. Nick Graham 11PPR History Coursework 1 ...read more.

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