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Factors leading to Hitler's Rise to Power

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Introduction

Oratory personality and leadership skills are the power to control people by speaking to them. Hitler was one of the first modern leaders to understand how to use propaganda to control people. He even had a government minister Dr Goebells in charge of propaganda. Here are Hitler's views on how to influence the masses of the people. Hitler hated the Treaty of Versailles. He also had strong racial beliefs, such as, his hatred of Jews and his belief that the Germans were the master race. His individual skills were very important when trying to get his views across. Hitler was able to use his great skills of communication to convince his party members about his beliefs. Eventually, through time, his views were drilled into his fellow party men so much that they actually believed in his views as much as he did. This brainwashing technique was used on the whole nation during his campaigning. This was undoubtedly due to his individual personality. He wanted all power and total control over the government. Overall, Hitler's oratory, personality and leadership were vital to his rise in Germany. This was obviously a Long-term cause to his rise as he was born with these qualities. He would rely on them all the way through his life. It is fair to say that if Hitler did not have these qualities, he would not of been noticed in Germany. All of these natural born skills were extremely important in Hitler's rise. Long and short-term causes which contributed to Hitler's rise, including the importance of each cause. The Munich Putsch As the Nazi party grew, Hitler began to unite with other small political groups against the communists. ...read more.

Middle

It has never been proved that it was a solitary act, a Communist plot or even Hitler's own doing. All that is known is that the Communists were blamed for all of it. Hitler knew that the fire would work to his advantage. After word had got out that all Communists had been captured, Communism practically ceased to exist in Germany. The public now feared the Communists and entrusted themselves in Hitler. They thought that the country was under attack by dangerous extremists. In such an emergency situation they would be more likely to support the government, and at the time, the Nazis were the government. Hitler now had the nation exactly where he wanted it. Thanks to the fire, the Nazis won the 1933 election with 17 million votes and 288 seats. As soon as Hitler became Chancellor, he appointed Herman Goering, another Nazi, as Minister of the Interior. Goering was now in charge of the police and the prisons. This way Hitler could use the police to round up his opponents once the fire had given him an excuse. So the end result was that by being chancellor he could take full advantage of the Reichstag Fire and the Nazis were able to win the election. This was a short-term cause for Hitler's rise to power. Obviously it was a stepping stone into his overall rise, but Papen and Hindenberg clearly underestimated Hitler. They thought that they could keep him happy by giving him the title of "Chancellor." They never dreamt that he would ever be so influential on the German government and that he would have the ability to do so much with Germany. ...read more.

Conclusion

It has never been proved that it was a solitary act, a Communist plot or even Hitler's own doing. All that is known is that the Communists were blamed for all of it. Hitler knew that the fire would work to his advantage. After word had got out that all Communists had been captured, Communism practically ceased to exist in Germany. The public now feared the Communists and entrusted themselves in Hitler. They thought that the country was under attack by dangerous extremists. In such an emergency situation they would be more likely to support the government, and at the time, the Nazis were the government. Hitler now had the nation exactly where he wanted it. Thanks to the fire, the Nazis won the 1933 election with 17 million votes and 288 seats. As soon as Hitler became Chancellor, he appointed Herman Goering, another Nazi, as Minister of the Interior. Goering was now in charge of the police and the prisons. This way Hitler could use the police to round up his opponents once the fire had given him an excuse. So the end result was that by being chancellor he could take full advantage of the Reichstag Fire and the Nazis were able to win the election. This was a short-term cause for Hitler's rise to power. Obviously it was a stepping stone into his overall rise, but Papen and Hindenberg clearly underestimated Hitler. They thought that they could keep him happy by giving him the title of "Chancellor." They never dreamt that he would ever be so influential on the German government and that he would have the ability to do so much with Germany. At the moment though, Hitler is still insignificant, as he has no overall power yet. This is why this is a short term cause, as he quickly passes the "Enabling Law" which does give him overall power. ...read more.

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