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Haig was quite successful in the years 1917-1918 because during these years Haig led the British soldiers to victory. He did this in a number of ways. These are some of them.

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Introduction

General Haig Coursework Question D5 Haig was quite successful in the years 1917-1918 because during these years Haig led the British soldiers to victory. He did this in a number of ways. These are some of them. The only real success of the Nivelle Offensive was for the Canadian troops, who were fighting at Vimy Ridge. They had managed to secretly bring lots of men to the front line trenches using underground tunnels. When they attacked they took the Germans by surprise and managed to successfully gain the ridge with few casualties. Nearby, British troops stormed Arras. It started with a huge artillery barrage. It was much more accurate than the one on the Somme. Haig had ordered his commanders to include 'ruses', such as stopping for a while, in the bombardment. This is when you stop the bombardment so that the enemy would come out of their dugouts, then starting again suddenly to kill as many Germans as possible. ...read more.

Middle

The attack included 400 tanks. Hundreds of Allied planes also attacked the enemy with their machine guns and dropped ammunition and food to advancing troops. On this one day the British Army advanced 8 up to miles. As the offensive continued the German army began to crumble. The troops were dispirited. The German army was now to weak to hold back the Allies. Haigs' earlier policy of 'attrition' had now been fulfilled. However the Germans weren't defeated yet, they were inflicting heavy casualties on the advancing Allies. The Germans were also falling back on the 'Hindenburg Line' of defences. In September British troops attacked the Hindenburg Line. In two days the artillery, tanks and infantry created a 12-mile wide hole in the Hindenburg Line. This was a major success for Haig and the British Army. General Haig was unsuccessful during the years of 1917-1918 because he lost or the advantage was to the Germans in the majority of the battles. ...read more.

Conclusion

An attack on Flanders would also stop the Germans attacking the French in the south. Like the Somme Haig didn't mind how much land was gained, he believed it would contribute to the 'wearing down' of the Germans Army. The land in Flanders is very low-lying and floods easily; this is why the attack was planned for July. Shortly before the attack it rained very heavily. The land turned to mud. Haig still decided to press on with the attack. The artillery bombardment lasted two weeks. It turned the battlefield into a sticky mess; in some places the mud was twenty feet deep. The British soldiers found it difficult to wade through the mud, some even drowned. Tanks were also sent into the battle, they found it impossible to operate in the mud. On the other hand the rain made it difficult for the Germans to defend. Their trenches flooded and collapsed. The Germans still resisted. British progress was extremely slow. There were huge casualties on both sides and little ground was gained. Ziggy Niblett ...read more.

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