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History - 1960's Coursework - Question 2

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Introduction

Question 2- I believe that Source C does not fully support the evidence of Sources A and B about the effects of pop music in the 1960s. Source C was publicly produced in 1985 by Paul McCartney, a member of the 1960's pop band, The Beatles. He was talking about Beatle concerts from the view of a performer. It was produced to describe what the concerts were really like, and consequently had a positive attitude towards the fans and concerts. It is more reliable than a fan's point of view, like it is in Source B, because a performer knows what it is really like to be on stage. ...read more.

Middle

This, however, is also a similarity between the sources; the fact that the fans were screaming. The Rolling Stones may have been intimidated however, due to the fact they would be playing in what would be the middle of a stadium, with no way out except through the fans. The only other similarity between the sources is that they are both secondary sources, and therefore are both memories, which reduces the reliability of both sources, because memories can often be exaggerated, or are different from how you remember them. The two sources also conflict because they describe two different bands, which would naturally have different fans that would act in a different way at concerts, and the fans for the Rolling Stones would probably have been louder and more aggressive. ...read more.

Conclusion

her version of events could have been exaggerated There are a couple of similarities between the sources, one of which is the fact that they are both showing the popularity of the Beatles in the 1960s, and, like Sources B + C, it is a secondary source and a memory, and is not completely reliable and/or accurate. The sources also differ because of the different point of views. Source C was from the view of a performer, and would really know what being on stage was like, and so would be more reliable than the exaggerated Lumley version of events. Source A is also less reliable about the atmosphere at concerts because Lumley was only watching her favourite band on TV, and not in a concert. ...read more.

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