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History 1960s Coursework

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Introduction

QUESTION 1 Source A is telling us that the streets of London were astonishingly empty when the Beatles were going to be appearing on a television show. This is a written source, written by Joanna Lumley for the purpose of sharing her memories. The source tells us that when the Beatles were going to appear on television, instead of the usual rush hour, people would all rush home to make sure they catch it. Joanna Lumley says: "The nation held its breath" which expresses her views on how excited the nation was. Although this tells us that some people were in fact extremely excited; Joanna Lumley and probably a number of people she knew, it doesn't tell us how the whole nation felt about this and only really tells us how Joanna Lumley felt therefore the source is not that useful, Joanna Lumley's memories may be distorted (her remembering how few people were on the streets) by the fact that she herself felt that excitement. QUESTION 2 Sources C and A are similar as they both talk about the Beatles. Source A is a written source, written by Joanna Lumley in the 1990s, remembering the events of the 1960s and the purpose is to share memories. Source C is also a written source and is how Paul McCartney describing what it was like to interact with the Beatles fans, it's purpose is also to share memories. ...read more.

Middle

However, the source is definitely not entirely useful as it doesn't tell us how people reacted to it. It doesn't say whether it was a popular show, or if many young people actually tuned in and watched it, only that it would be broadcasted. Source E is a description of radio in the 1960s, written in the 1990s by someone who was around at the time, written to tell people what it felt like for teenagers to finally have their own music to listen to and not have to listen to the same music as their parents. It is useful because the person who wrote it was actually there at the time and knew what it felt like. However, it is not useful in the way that it doesn't tell everything, it doesn't tell us how everyone felt, just how this one person felt at the time. QUESTION 4 Source F is part of an article written in the Daily Mail, 25 May 1964. It is written to inform readers that a schoolteacher, Mary Whitehouse had "launched a campaign to help writers who find it difficult to induce the BBC TV to screen their work." Mary Whitehouse disapproved of rock music as she believed it encouraged young people to use drugs and have sex before marriage and believed it went against Christianity. ...read more.

Conclusion

They would disagree with this because when people look back on the era, they look back on it fondly. They remember having lots of fun and therefore we must assume that it did no harm. People like Joanna Lumley, who wrote source A and the fan of the Rolling Stones who wrote Source B both look back on the 1960s fondly and don't mention that the bands were a bad influence on their lives. Paul McCartney also looks back fondly of the time when Popular Culture was important, he doesn't talk about how he or his band members done drugs or were a bad influence on people. Source D and E tell us that young people were given freedom to express themselves by listening to their own styles of music. Source H tells us that teenagers now had money and were being targeted by the entertainment industry. Source I tells us that more young people were staying in full-time education and that is a good thing, so, one must assume that it done no harm. On the other hand, some people would agree with this because of people like Mary Whitehouse who were around at the time, insisting that Popular Culture had a bad influence on young people and singers like Janis Joplin who were becoming bad role models for young people, dying at a young age due to a drug overdose. People would have to agree because many of the sources describe the fans of these bands as insane, even "maniacal" in some cases. ...read more.

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