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hitler and the holocaust

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Introduction

INTRODUCTION Adolf Hitler, (1889-1945), was a German political and military leader and one of the 20th century's most powerful dictators. Hitler changed Germany into a fully militarized society and launched World War II in 1939. He made anti-Semitism a keystone of his propaganda and policies and built the Nazi Party into a mass movement. He hoped to conquer the entire world, and for a time dominated most of Europe and much of North Africa. He instituted sterilization and euthanasia measures to enforce his idea of racial purity among German people and caused the slaughter of millions of Jews, Sinti and Roma (Gypsies), Slavic peoples, and many others, all of whom he considered inferior. THE RISE OF HITLER -Early Days- Adolf Hitler was born in 1889. His father was a customs officer. In his childhood days, Hitler disliked his father quite a lot, as they strongly differed about career plans, giving Hitler no options of what to do in life and the respect of love. His father wanted him to work hard and get a good job, so he would have future, like him. Adolf was quite clever in school, but then, after being sent to another school, which was approved by his father, he distorted himself. He became lazy and often got into trouble because he did not do his work. ...read more.

Middle

They formed a group called the Nazi Party. The group worked intensely hard to make their much-loved Germany greater and richer. Gradually, the Nazi Party became bigger and bigger. More and more people joined in, for the sake of their adored country. They went to listen to Hitler's speeches, as he had an astonishing talent in public speaking that could convince people as a result, effortlessly. People stood and listened to him for two hours without moving, seeing that they believed everything he said. He told the people at his speeches, that he would make Germany great, and find them jobs and make them rich. So, they followed Hitler for the reason that they all secretly wanted to be great and get rich, as they assumed that Hitler would do as he acquainted with them. -Hitler, the German leader- Hitler became the leader of Germany in 1933. Some Germans disliked him and the Nazi Party, as they said the Nazis were brutal and vicious. It was also said that Hitler and the Nazis had stopped people being able to vote for the government. Hitler hated people having these ideas, which could put him under pressure and anxiety, so he sent these people in to prison. Hitler loathed and hated Jewish people. At that time, there were many Jews in Germany then, but they had not done any harm, what so ever. ...read more.

Conclusion

The Nazis also herded Jewish Poles into city ghettoes, killing thousands of them and condemning the rest to starvation. Within Germany, Hitler ordered a program to systematically kill handicapped Germans, and over 200,000 were eventually murdered. The German authorities planned to kill all Jews in the portions of the USSR they occupied and began the process in the summer of 1941. In late July 1941, Hitler decided to extend the systematic killing of Jews to all of German-occupied Europe. After the renewed German offensive in the USSR in October 1941 appeared to make great progress, he decided the time had come to go even further: All Jews on earth would be killed. However, the Nazis found that German police and soldiers who did the killing were often traumatized by the experience. To make the slaughter faster and less stressful, the Germans built specially designed death camps, primarily in occupied Poland, to which Jews and other prisoners from all over Europe were transported. These camps contained large gas chambers where hundreds of prisoners at a time could be quickly, easily, and impersonally murdered by poison gas. In his public speeches, Hitler repeatedly referred to the killing of Europe's Jews but without detailing the process. Because the Allies halted Germany's forces, Hitler's global ambitions were not realized; however, of the approximately 18 million Jews in the world, one-third was killed in what came to be known as the Holocaust. The great majority of European Jews perished, a fact that Hitler boasted of in his last testament. 1 ...read more.

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