• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

"Hitler's domestic policies between 1933 and 1939 enjoyed widespread popularity among the German people" how far would you agree?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

"Hitler's domestic policies between 1933 and 1939 enjoyed widespread popularity among the German people" how far would you agree? To say that between 1933 and 1939 Hitler's domestic policies enjoyed widespread popularity is a disputable statement and to understand to what extent the Nazi government was popular it is necessary to investigate factors regarding domestic policies. When Nazi came to power in 1933, Hitler did not start his chancellorship in a happy way. In his first seventeen months in power there were plenty of opportunities to see the radical, chaotic and destructive nature of Nazi rule. When he called the election for the role of "confidence" imposing bans on newspapers and public meetings attacking the new state and with thousand of political opponents already rounded up, the Nazis gained only 43.9 per cent of the vote in March 1933 and they failed to acquire the absolute majority they had hoped for. It is obvious from statistics that they lost voters although they still had more votes than the other parties. These "more" voters compared to other parties was a results of promises to be maintained by Hitler in his "superb" speeches telling people what they wanted to hear. Economy was a big issue in the Nazi popularity. One academic joked once: "What was Hitler's economic policy?" ...read more.

Middle

Most Germans did not confront the regime. They believed that1933 was the beginning of a wonderful new period for Germany as a witness describes it "everything was in order again, and clean. There was a feeling of national liberation, a new start". There were the concentration camps, but everybody said at that time that the English invented them in South Africa with the Boers. The Nazis wanted Germans to believe that the concentration camps were "merely" places designed to shock opponents of the regime into conforming. Since the terror was mostly confined to the Nazis political opponents or to Jews, the majority of Germans could watch what Goring called "the settling of scores" with equanimity if not pleasure. On 6 July 1933 Hitler announced that he wanted an end to violence on the street "revolution is not a permanent state", he declared. He realised that the SA posed a threat to the stability of the new Germany. One group of powerful Germans agreed with him wholeheartedly: the army. Ernst Rohm, leader of the SA, was trying to take over the armed forces of Germany. They thought he wanted to integrate the Nazi SA into the regular army and become supreme commander of them all. Hitler himself felt compelled to act against the SA. ...read more.

Conclusion

they would join "Hitler Youth" until the age of 18, Nazis aim was to create a new generation that could be used in the future wars. One of the member later said "we were politically programmed". Young people could have different opinions about this movements but they did not have a choice, their parents had to send them there or the Gestapo (Nazi secret police) could intervene severely on them. Young people could have liked these movement because they could have meet new teenagers like them but on the other hand it must have been unsupportable for youth to do the same "routine" every day. There is no discussion the way Trade Unionist and left-wing political leaders felt towards the Nazis during 1933-1939:hate. Trade unions has been banned in 1933, the trade unionists lost their jobs. Nazis tried to win the support of the manual workers. The political parties leaders were killed or sent to concentration camps. Teachers, lawyer and doctors although some of them were Nazi believers, there were others anti-Nazis but they always acted like they had Nazi idea because of the concentration camps fear. Lastly it can be said the Nazis oppressed people making Germans believe they were doing a great job for the country and taking the freedom from people to express themselves. As a witness describes it: "You had to praise Hitler or taking a risk". MOHAMED OMAR ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Germany 1918-1939 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Germany 1918-1939 essays

  1. How did Hitler and the Nazis change the German economy and the lives of ...

    Between 1933 and 1936, employment in construction rose from only 666,000 to over 2,000,000, and factories encouraged by Goering or needed by the armed forced expanded enormously, creating new branches of production to cater for the new demand on services.

  2. How significant was Nazi Propaganda in maintaining Hitler in power in the years ...

    (Geary, 1993, p.38). During the initial terror campaign following the seizure of power Geary tells us that KPD and SPD buildings were raided...party members were beaten up...'wild' concentration camps were set up...where Communists and Social Democrats were sometimes tortured and murdered.

  1. Hitler's domestic policies between 1933 + 1939 engaged widespread popularity among German people. How ...

    By putting people back to work and making huge public spending, inflation was bound to happen. However, Hitler kept this under control by not allowing wages to rise with prices. This may have been one unpopular aspect of Hitler's economic policy but there were many that the people supported.

  2. To what extent did the Nazis achieve an economic miracle in Germany between 1933-1939?

    For example, Kershaw's 'Profile of Hitler' seemed like a intellectual and analytical, based on my reading of the preface, however, the relevant content of the book was minimal for my investigation. A lot of time was wasted on this reading for such little return.

  1. How successful were the domestic policies of the Nazi Party 1933 - 1939?

    It has been described as an economic miracle because of the impact on unemployment, which fell to almost 300,000 by 1939. Yet this does tell the whole story. It fails to mention that many women were taken out of unemployment figures, Jews ware not counted and of course conscription into the army took another million men.

  2. How widespread and dangerous was Youth opposition in the Third Reich?

    not necessarily politically against Nazism and thus were not dangerous to them. All they wanted was to be left alone and enjoy a different way of life other than prescribed by the state. As they were mainly of bourgeois origin18 they had the money to meet in pubs, bars or private homes and dance to Anglo-American jazz.

  1. "The most important reason why there was little opposition in Germany towards the Nazi ...

    It entailed persuasion of employers to improve general working conditions for employees, such as air conditioning and heating, and hot meals in the factory. However, workers could not strike for better pay or conditions, and in some areas, they were prevented from moving to a better job.

  2. Describe how Jews were discriminated against in Germany from 1933 to 1939

    During the difficult years of the post-war period, Nazism offered new hopes. The Nazis promised everything to everybody. To the landowner and the industrialists, Hitler promised to destroy Communism, who would, otherwise take away their properties and assets. To the middle classes, he promised to abolish the Treaty of Versailles and relieve them of the burden of reparations payment.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work