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Hitler's Foreign Policy - Appesement and the Nazi-Soviet Pact.

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Introduction

´╗┐History Test ? Hitler?s Foreign Policy 1. Hitler had many aims in foreign policy: he wanted to destroy the Treaty of Versailles, to stop the reparation payments, to earn Lebensraum in East by invading Eastern Europe and the USSR, to achieve Pan-Germanic Nationalism, to rearm and to defeat communism. 1. Britain followed the policy of appeasement for many reasons. The first was that Britain did not want to repeat the horrors of World War One. They vividly remembered the horrific experiences of it and wanted to avoid another war at almost any cost and so, by appeasing Hitler, they could prevent another war. Another reason was that Hitler was standing up to Communism. ...read more.

Middle

This is because the remilitarisation was just part of Hitler?s defiance against the Treaty of Versailles and ultimately, through appeasement, Britain was going to let Hitler do what he wanted. However the Nazi Soviet Pact can be directly linked with Hitler?s invasion of Poland which was the tipping point which started World War Two. The demilitarisation of the Rhineland was one of the terms of the Treaty of Versailles. By trying to remilitarise the Rhineland, Hitler was taking a huge gamble. His German army was still relatively weak and small and therefore had been ordered that if there was any resistance, they should withdraw. This would have caused humiliation and Hitler would have lost the support of the Germany army as most of the generals were unsure about him. ...read more.

Conclusion

This treaty cleared the way for Germany?s invasion of Poland. On 1st September 1939 the German army invaded Poland from the west. Soviet forces invaded Poland from the east and it soon fell. I think that the Nazi Soviet Pact was a more important cause for the start of WW2 as it facilitated the invasion of Poland which Britain had vowed to go to war to protect, and in fact did. By invading Poland, Hitler stopped Britain appeasing (which might have continued) and started the war. Hitler was breaking many terms of the Treaty of Versailles and so his remilitarisation of the Rhineland was no different to building up his army or his navy which Britain had allowed Germany to do, and so did not directly cause the war to start. ...read more.

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