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Hitler's Rise to Power

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Introduction

Depth Study A: Germany 1918-1945 Assignment 1: Objectives 1 & 2 Hitler's Rise to Power Five reasons contributing to Hitler's rise to power: 1. The Treaty of Versailles 2. The Munich Putsch 3. Hitler's oratory, personality and leadership 4. The Economic Depression 5. The Enabling Law 6. The decision by Hindenburg to appoint Hitler as chancellor 1) Using one of the causes from the list explain how it contributed to Hitler's rise in power. Hitler's oratory personality and leadership contributed to his rise to power as he managed to gain great popularity from the German people through his charisma, his dominating personality and his exceptional public speaking skills. So it was he himself that was a very significant factor, which helped him to spread the Nazi's message, and certainly aided his rise to power. Hitler was recognised for his speaking skills during the First World War; his officers gave him the job of using his oratory to counter enemy propaganda when leaflets where showered on German trenches. After the World war Hitler continued working for the German army still using these abilities to successfully counter the opposition of various extremist groups. The army sent Hitler to a meeting of a small nationalist group called the German Workers party. Hitler found that he agreed with many of the opinions and ideas of the group so he soon became a member himself. Here Hitler's talent as a propagandist helped him to gain recognition from the group's leader and Hitler was soon helping to draft the party's programs. ...read more.

Middle

In stormed Hitler and his fellow party members. The Nazis were supposed to be supported by the Bavarian government when they proposed to seize power and march to Berlin to overtake control of the country. However their plan failed and the army were surprisingly on command when the party were walking through Munich, Fire broke out and 16 Nazis were killed. The leaders of this deed were then all placed under arrest and then faced trial. In many ways the Munich Putsch was seen as a complete failure on the Nazis part, it was easily crushed and showed how powerless the Nazis really were. But it also provided a very important building block towards Hitler's and the Nazis success. The Munich putsch launched the Nazis onto the national scene and made Hitler famous. It made Hitler stronger as a person and his time in jail provided him time to plan his rise to power. It gave him time to reflect upon the strengths and weaknesses of the Nazis. He realised the Nazis points of reasoning and that they would not just need support from their people but that these people would need to feel that they could die for the cause. Nazi martyrs would need to be born from promotions, propaganda - any tool that the Nazis had available to them. Most importantly from their time in jail the Nazis used their trials to promote their cause. ...read more.

Conclusion

For example with out the reparations term of the Treaty of Versailles, Germany may not have needed to borrow the enormous sums of money they did from American banks, therefore Germany would not have been as badly affected by the Wall Street Crash in 1929. This also links to Hitler's oratory, personality and leadership as Hitler used the abolition of the Treaty of Versailles as one of the main Nazi's aims. The economic crisis also lead on to the Munich Putsch, which gave Hitler the chance to gain popularity and fame throughout Germany during the trials. The Munich Putsch although was itself a failure showed how far the Nazis would go to fight for what they believed in even if the odds were very unevenly against them. All of these events gave Hitler the opportunity to use publicity stunts, to make moving speeches and to use propaganda to gain the peoples trust in the Nazis and Hitler as a leader. This gained a lot more support for the Nazi's and eventually they became the largest political party in Germany. This meant that as Hitler was the leader of it he should now become chancellor but Hindenburg was reluctant, but after being faced with the alternative of Nazi revolt and civil war there was no other option. Hitler was appointed as chancellor which was a huge step towards Hitler's rise in power. Hitler now had more power from the inside of the government. This gave him the grounds to be able to have passed the Enabling Act finally giving Hitler total power as dictator of Germany. ...read more.

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