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Hitler's Rise to Power

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Introduction

Hitler's Rise to Power 29/30 A* Hitler's hatred of the harsh and humiliating Treaty of Versailles, and the Weimar Government that was imposed by the Treaty, was what turned him towards politics in the first place. It was his hatred of the Treaty that took him to the top of the Nazi party and drove him to attempt the Munich Putsch. He believed the 'November Criminals', the politicians who signed the Treaty betrayed Germany and back-stabbed the German Army, who could have won the war. His hatred of the 'November Criminals' lead him to believe he should take Germany by force and reverse the terms of the Treaty. Hitler's hatred of the Treaty was also shown through the Nazi party manifestos, and the idea of smashing the Treaty and restoring Germany's military muscle appealed to many ex-soldiers and ex-civil servants who lost their jobs when Germany signed the Treaty. Hitler's amazing oratory skills and his charisma helped convince these disaffected individuals that Hitler was a man who could help them. ...read more.

Middle

Two types of causes contributed to Hitler's rise to power: long-term causes and short-term causes. Both are necessary for events to occur and both were required for Hitler to rise to power in Germany. A good example interaction is that between the economic depression of the thirties and Hitler's oratory and leadership skills. When the Depression occurred, Hitler suddenly had millions of people who were willing to listen to him and his views. Before this, Hitler could have been the best speaker in the world, but his radical discontentment with the Weimar Government when things seemed to be going well. Germany's prosperity was due to American loans, however, and when the Wall Street Crash occurred and America plunged into a depression, the loans had to be repaid, causing economic turmoil in Germany. People were suddenly ready to listen to Hitler's extremist policies. Hitler's charisma, now that he had a large audience, attracted a vast number of people to the Nazi party and their message could be spread through the packed rallies that the Nazis held. ...read more.

Conclusion

Without this publicity, when the Depression struck the public might not have remembered him and many of those that voted for him might never have been attracted to the Nazis. If the Treaty of Versailles had never been so harsh and humiliating then Hitler might not have been driven into politics by his hatred of it and, even if he was, he might have lost many voters who didn't hate the Treaty so much. The Germans might not have had to reduce their army and Hitler might never have been able to form the SA, which would have lost him control of the streets and maybe the Munich Putsch would never have occurred. If Hitler had been a terrible orator his message would never have reached an audience, and he might never have got a large percentage of the vote. As we can see it is very difficult to single out which factor played the greatest role in Hitler's rise to power and because of this it is very difficult to prioritise importance. ...read more.

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