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How Close to War did the World come over Cuba in 1962?

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Introduction

How Close to War did the World come over Cuba in 1962? It all started when a communist revolution took place in Cuba, an island ninety miles away from the United States of America. This was a great blow to the United States as many American businesses were dependent on Cuba. In April 1961, the C.I.A organised an attack on Cuba led by Cuban exiles in an attempt to restore American control. They landed in a place called the Bay of Pigs and set up a base for guerrilla war against the Cuban government. They expected other Cubans to rise up and join the rebellion, but they misunderstood the popularity of the communist dictator, Fidel Castro. Consequently, the Cuban government easily defeated the invasion force. The struggle for control of Cuba was part of a worldwide Cold War. ...read more.

Middle

'No missile capable of reaching the United States will be placed in Cuba'. Khrushchev made this quote during a speech to the public. On October 14, a U-2 spy plane flew over Cuba and took photographs of the missile site. President Kennedy of the United States was shown the photographs proving that Soviet missile were on Cuba. At this stage, the Americans spent six days secretly discussing and planning how to respond. They did not even consult their closest ally, the government of Britain until the 21st of October. This was shortly before Kennedy made an announcement to the American people about the crisis and the likelihood of a war. Kennedy decided to prepare for an invasion of Cuba. But first, he mounted a blockade of the island. On 22nd October, he issued a quarantine of all ships headed to Cuba. ...read more.

Conclusion

The Americans were unsure of how to respond. They had already considered taking their missiles out of Turkey but Kennedy did not want to lose his pride and be seen backing down in the face of the Soviets. American military leaders recommended an immediate air attack on Cuba that would consequently mean an outbreak of war. A letter was about to be sent to the Soviets refusing to do a deal over the missiles in Turkey but fortunately, at this point Kennedy changed his mind. He decided to first letter and sent another letter to Khrushchev accepting the Soviet proposal that the missiles should be withdrawn in return for an American commitment not to invade Cuba. Both countries agreed on this and the crisis was finally over. In conclusion, there was an immense possibility of a nuclear war over the Cuban missile crisis which had accumulated over the space of two and a half years and thankfully to both Kennedy's than finally Khrushchev's careful judgement the war was avoided. ...read more.

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