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How did both long-term and short-term causes contribute to Hitler's rise in power?

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Introduction

How did both long-term and short-term causes contribute to Hitler's rise in power? Long-term causes take a long period to come about, the effects are felt for a long time and it takes a long time to reach its climax or consequence whereas short-term causes take a short period of time to come about, the effects are felt for a short time and it takes only a short period to reach its climax or consequence. The Weimar Government was in power between 1919 and 1923. It was a weak government as the voting system of proportional representation produced weak coalition governments, which were unable to provide Germany with a strong central government. The Weimar government had been born out of defeat and revolution and so never had the support of many Germans including the army, the civil service, the police, the judiciary and the universities and schools. Weimar politicians were also burdened with problems, which hampered their efforts to give the Republic a good name. Many Germans blamed them for 'stabbing the army in the back' by signing the Armistice in November 1918, for the Treaty of Versailles (1919), reparations, the terrifying inflation of 1922-1923 and for German's dependence on loans from the United States through the Dawes Plan (1924) ...read more.

Middle

His ability to influence a popular assembly is uncanny". Hitler had served in the Germany army when war broke out in 1919. He was awarded the Iron Cross for his bravery and commitment. He was often shown with his Iron Cross as the Germans greatly respected him for his distinction and it helped him gain popularity. It was a direct contrast to the 'November Criminals'. The Munich Putsch happened in 1923 but only filled a period of nine months. It was a turning point in Hitler's political career. In late 1923 Hitler decided the time was right for a revolution in Germany. Chancellor Stresemann had just agreed to end the strike in the Ruhr and to start paying reparations again. Hitler felt that this would anger most Germans and he hoped that they would support a party that promised to oppose France and to stop paying reparations. He even gained the support of a national hero named General Ludendorff who had commanded the German army on the Western Front in the First World War in the hope that German people who hadn't heard of the Nazis would follow his example. Hitler's plan was to seize control of Bavaria and then to march into Berlin. ...read more.

Conclusion

Now a short-term cause came into play. Hitler decided that there must be an end to democracy in Germany and that he should become dictator. On 23rd March 1933 he forced the Reichstag to pass the Enabling Act. The Act gave him the legal power to make laws without consulting the Reichstag. By arresting or banning many members of opposition parties he was able to get the Act passed. By passing the Enabling Act, Hitler became a dictator of Germany. Although the Enabling Act was a short-term cause it had long-term effects as it enabled Hitler to begin his plans on Germany and Europe without interference from the Reichstag. Therefore I have proved that it is slightly na�ve to believe that a short-term cause always has short-term effects and consequences and that long-term causes always have long-term effects and consequences. This was true for both the Munich Putsch and the Enabling Law. I have also shown that long and short-term causes are often linked. The weakness of the Weimar Government meant that it signed the Treaty of Versailles (or so the Germans thought). This led to the French invading the Ruhr and therefore Hitler leading the Munich Putsch. Through the Munich Putsch being unsuccessful (a short-term cause) Hitler changed his strategy to democracy (a long-term event) and eventually Von Papen and Hindenburg made him chancellor. This then gave him the opportunity to pass the Enabling Law. ...read more.

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