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How did hitler consolidate power

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Introduction

How did Hitler consolidate power? In order to gain power in Germany, Hitler used force to make people agree with him even if they didn't want to. In addition, he did deals with people to manipulate their opinions and way of thinking to suit his. He used a clever combination of methods; some legal, other suspicious. Also, he managed to overpower or reach agreements with those who could have stopped him. An example of Hitler using force to achieve power is the Reichstag fire: once Hitler was Chancellor he took steps to finalize a Nazi takeover of Germany. In March 1933, Hitler called for another election, trying to get an overall Nazi majority in the Reichstag. ...read more.

Middle

Another example of Hitler using force to gain power is in January 1934 when he took over all state governments, and when he created the Law against the Formation of New Parties in July 1933. In addition, an example of Hitler combining force and concessions to attain power was the Night of the Long Knives. Leading up to this event Hitler had made sure any potential opponents of the Nazis had either left Germany or had been taken to special concentration camps run by the SS, when he became Chancellor a year before. All other political parties were banned. Yet Hitler was still not entirely secure, as he was a paranoid man. ...read more.

Conclusion

Furthermore, trade unions were banned on 2nd May 1933 and all workers belonged to the new German Labour Front (DAF). Moreover, an agreement was made between the state and the Roman Catholic Church, this intended that government protected religious freedom but the church was banned from political activity. The last and final consolidation that bought Hitler ultimate power was the death of President Hindenburg, which meant that Hitler became Fuhrer of Germany. On 2nd August 1934 the whole army swore an oath of personal loyalty to Hitler. The army approved to stay out of politics and to serve Hitler. In response, Hitler spent huge sums on rearmament, bought back conscription and made plans to make Germany a great military power once again. ?? ?? ?? ?? Saimah Sarwar 11Y History ...read more.

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