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How did long-term and short-term causes help Hitler rise to power

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Introduction

A combination of many causes helped Hitler rise to power. These were short-term and long-term. Hitler needed a certain amount of points in parliament to get into power. All of these factors gainedehimepublicesupportsinsoneswaysorsanother. In 1923, Hitler planned a rebellion against the Weimar Goverment known as the Munich Putsch, in an attempt to establish a Nazi government in its place. This was unsuccessful and although Hitler was put on trial and spent about 9 months in prison, this turned out to be a marvellous propaganda of triumph for him. Among the people, he seemed a hero. The Munich Putsch was a long-term cause, since it was very important to Hitler's political campaign. ...read more.

Middle

to win their support. The Depression was a very important factor for the Nazis, since it strengthened their support and increased public fear of communism. It is reasonable to say that the Depression was a short-term cause, since it didn't last for a long period of time, and it was cured rapidly. A long- term cause was The Treaty of Versailles and the anger that was resented about it. This created a very strong bitterness to which Hitler's viciousness and expansionism appealed, so a lot of germans gavehhimksupport because of this. The Treaty of Versailles caused chaos in Germany many years after the terms were agreed. It was already hated inHpeoplestmind,HandDHitlerDstrengthenedDtheDhate. ...read more.

Conclusion

If it was not for his oratory he could not use the Treaty of Versailles, the Depression to get support and go against the Weimar Republic with good reasons. If there hadn't been a Depression, he would have not won enough support so Hindenburg might not have chosen him at all. If Papen and Hindenburg hadn't decided to appoint Hitler Chancellor, there would have never been an enabling law, which enabled Hitler to become a dictator. If Hitler's oratory, personality and leadership skills weren't as good as they were Hitler wouldn't have got anywhere in life, nowhere near to becoming the leader of Germany. As we can see, one reason leads to the other. Without this combination of causes Hitler would never have been able to become Chancellor of Germany. ...read more.

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