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how did protestant politicians explain social economic and political differences between catholics and protestants

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Introduction

How did Protestant politicians explain the social, economic and political differences between Catholic and Protestant? The government in Northern Ireland has been mainly protestant since 1922 when the parliament was set up. There were two types of politicians... those who were extremist like Reverend Ian Paisley and those who were more moderate like O'Neill [from the Ulster Unionist party]; although both believed that Catholics wanted to become more powerful and end the discriminations they claimed took place against them. Catholics suffered many social, economic and political differences like lower quality education, unfair job and housing allocation and virtually no support in the government to help them in their struggle for equality. ...read more.

Middle

Catholics had therefore become poor because of their laziness in comparisation to the traditional protestant work ethic. The government tried to explain the unjust council-housing allocation and the difference in employment by saying that protestants were more loyal than Catholics... as Ian Paisley said: "if jobs are scarce Protestants should get these jobs". Amongst politicians there were different views. Some claimed that there was no discrimination whilst others said that "religion was blind" and that Protestants should have preference over the Catholic second-class citizens. O'Neill saw Catholics as the problem to public order and peace, and that Protestant people in Northern Ireland ought to be dominant over the Catholic population. ...read more.

Conclusion

and to achieve this they'd want to destroy the actual Northern Ireland. Despite all of these accusations the Catholic Church in the Irish republic did nothing to help... Still, some politicians claim that all people face disadvantages economically and politically and that discrimination occurred regardless of religion; it was impossible to keep everyone happy. This was done to take importance to the fact that Catholics were being segregated in all senses by the racist politicians who had to say that they were a threat for their Protestant-country simply because they had different ideas. ...read more.

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