• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

How did protestant politicians explain the social, economic and political differences between Catholics and Protestants?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

How did protestant politicians explain the social, economic and political differences between Catholics and Protestants? The Political views of Northern Ireland are split; this 'Division amongst Unionists' (Ironic?) have made many controversial arguments. There are two types of protestant politicians, there are the peaceful and democratic moderates like O'Neill who only see Catholics, as problems to public order and peace and who think the Protestant people of Northern Ireland should be dominant over the Catholic population. On the other hand, extremists like Reverend Ian Paisley. These extremist political leaders think Catholics are 'demonic' or 'satanic' and believe that they are foreign peoples to Northern Ireland. ...read more.

Middle

Under Prime Minister Sean Lemass (Elected 1959, served until 1966), Ireland's sluggish economy was given a boost. The First Programme for Economic Expansion, economic mobility, consumer spending, and foreign trade increased, while emigration decreased. In spite of this newfound economic stability, Ireland still had a difficult time joining the European Economic Community, as did Britain. In the worldwide oil crisis and ensuing recession forced Ireland into deflation, which inspired efforts to tax farmers' incomes, and wealth taxes. This obviously didn't create a good image of Prime Minister Cosgrove in the public eye, and Jack Lynch of Fianna F�il was re-elected in 1977. The Fianna F�il proposed to cut taxes and borrow money from other nations to get back on its feet. ...read more.

Conclusion

Protestant saw no real Catholic case in the matter and mocked the Civil Rights Protesters. The Protestant Politicians justified their discrimination against the catholic people with their own righteousness, claiming steak to the whole of the north of Ireland and politically pushing the Catholics off the scene, using Gerrymandering and force to move the Catholics into their own area of Ireland, labelling them as evil and satanic so that they might want to leave and go back to Southern Ireland. The main goal of the political injustice was to reinforce the Unionist sight so that the rest of Ireland would be taken into the sway of the British Empire. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Northern Ireland 1965-85 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Northern Ireland 1965-85 essays

  1. How did Protestant Politicians explain the social, economic and political differences between Catholics and ...

    Roman Catholic Church, so that they could bring back laws such as no abortion or divorce. The Politicians also feared the Roman Catholic Church because of many of the things that Ian Paisley had told them. He told them that the Pope was the Anti-Christ and Catholics were a group of satanic people.

  2. How Did the Catholics Grow To hate the Protestants?

    The British government agreed to their demands and in 1972 gave a 'special category' for prisoners who had committed crimes for political reasons. One of the special treatments was they were allowed to wear their own clothes and they didn't do any prison work.

  1. How did the Protestant politicians explain the social, economic and political differences between Catholic ...

    Altogether, it is fair to say that the Protestant politicians had many different views on the treatment of the Catholics. O' Neil attempted to help the Catholics but lost his job as Prime Minister. Politicians such as Paisley pursued a policy of hatred towards him and therefore, he was pushed out of office.

  2. Ireland - What are the main differences between the beliefs of the Republicans/Nationalists and ...

    the Nationalists, for others Home Rule was never forgotten, just temporarily put on hold. The Nationalists at the time that all this was happening felt that they were doing badly under rule from England. They wanted to be able to govern affairs from a parliament in their own country.

  1. How did Protestant politicians explain the social, economic and political differences between Catholic and ...

    He did not lie and he did he could see all the problems in Northern Ireland and he did no deny that there were no problems. An example of O'Neill's fairness was when he introduced the "one man vote" but this was opposed by the Unionists as it would be.

  2. What are the main differences between the Catholics and the Protestants

    They both feel British forces protect them from terrorism. They are the minority in Ireland as a whole but the majority in Northern Ireland. They don't want a United Ireland as they feel they will be under Catholic control. They feel they have nothing in common with Catholics, who tried to stab Britain in the back during the First

  1. Ireland's incredible economic success has left many countries in complete fascination.

    The state was also opened up culturally and socially. There was a �220 million state investment in an integrated system of national development. The establishment of the state television service, Telefis Eireann in 1962, with American and British programmes had a huge effect in changing attitudes.

  2. How Did Protestant Politicians Explain The Social, Economic And political Differences Between Catholics And ...

    Other Politicians claimed that Catholics did have good jobs and were not discriminated at all. Politicians like Ian Paisley admitted that there were variations between Catholics and protestant but he said that these differences were necessary in order to maintain the loyalty of the protestant majority.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work