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How did protestant politicians explain the social, economic and political differences between Catholics and Protestants?

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Introduction

How did protestant politicians explain the social, economic and political differences between Catholics and Protestants? The Political views of Northern Ireland are split; this 'Division amongst Unionists' (Ironic?) have made many controversial arguments. There are two types of protestant politicians, there are the peaceful and democratic moderates like O'Neill who only see Catholics, as problems to public order and peace and who think the Protestant people of Northern Ireland should be dominant over the Catholic population. On the other hand, extremists like Reverend Ian Paisley. These extremist political leaders think Catholics are 'demonic' or 'satanic' and believe that they are foreign peoples to Northern Ireland. ...read more.

Middle

Under Prime Minister Sean Lemass (Elected 1959, served until 1966), Ireland's sluggish economy was given a boost. The First Programme for Economic Expansion, economic mobility, consumer spending, and foreign trade increased, while emigration decreased. In spite of this newfound economic stability, Ireland still had a difficult time joining the European Economic Community, as did Britain. In the worldwide oil crisis and ensuing recession forced Ireland into deflation, which inspired efforts to tax farmers' incomes, and wealth taxes. This obviously didn't create a good image of Prime Minister Cosgrove in the public eye, and Jack Lynch of Fianna F�il was re-elected in 1977. The Fianna F�il proposed to cut taxes and borrow money from other nations to get back on its feet. ...read more.

Conclusion

Protestant saw no real Catholic case in the matter and mocked the Civil Rights Protesters. The Protestant Politicians justified their discrimination against the catholic people with their own righteousness, claiming steak to the whole of the north of Ireland and politically pushing the Catholics off the scene, using Gerrymandering and force to move the Catholics into their own area of Ireland, labelling them as evil and satanic so that they might want to leave and go back to Southern Ireland. The main goal of the political injustice was to reinforce the Unionist sight so that the rest of Ireland would be taken into the sway of the British Empire. ...read more.

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