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How did Protestant politicians explain the social economic and political differences between Catholics and Protestants?

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Introduction

Northern Ireland Coursework 2. How did Protestant politicians explain the social economic and political differences between Catholics and Protestants? Protestant politicians tried to explain the differences between Catholics and Protestants in terms of political, religious and cultural differences. Politicians like Ian Paisley had very extreme views on why these differences existed. Whilst others, like Terence O'Neill, who was a Protestant, were willing to improve things for the Catholics. Many Protestant politicians thought that local elections were carried out fairly, and that the Catholics did not face any political discrimination. The fact that some Nationalist councillors were elected was used as proof of this. Ian Paisley thought differently, he thought that Catholics were not interested in the politics as their loyalty was with Rome and with the Pope. He thought therefore that they could never be loyal to the government of Ulster; he therefore labelled them as 'traitors'. Gerrymandering was done to stop these so-called traitors form entering local councils where they would probably betray the people of Ulster. It was also believed that if Catholics had a greater voice in politics they would make their own laws similar to those in the Republic, as had happened in the South when for example, divorce was banned in 1925. ...read more.

Middle

No surrender. We are king's men" and he also said "97% of Catholics are disloyal and disruptive". That was his opinion about the Catholics. Most Protestants believed that the Catholics were concentrated in the low skill, low pay jobs because they were not well educated regardless of the fact they had equal opportunities as the Protestants to go to grammar school and university. But this was not the reality because the government spent more money on resources for the Protestants and neglected the Catholics, which are why the Catholics were most unlikely to go to university. Some of the politicians even thought that the Catholics were naturally lazy and did not want to work hard, but this was just the Protestants opinion on why the Catholics did not have high skill, high pay jobs. But in fact it was a cover up for the discrimination the Protestants gave to the Catholics. They blamed the Catholics to cover up their unfairness. Other politicians said that the Catholics did have good jobs and were not discriminated against at all. ...read more.

Conclusion

They believed that the Catholics were naturally lazy and couldn't be bothered to do anything to improve their situation. Other politicians like Ian Paisley blamed the Catholic religion for the social disadvantages that the Catholics faced. He alleged that the Catholic Church is an evil association that works to enchain Protestants. Also that it keeps its followers backwards and uneducated. O' Neill though was more eager to admit that the Catholics did face social disadvantages based on religious chauvinism The Protestant politicians tried very hard to explain the social, economic and political differences between Catholics and Protestants. Individuals like Ian Paisley, who was an extreme loyalist, tried to blame the Catholics themselves and their religion for the disadvantages a majority of Catholics faced. Terrence O'Neill who was a Protestant, on the other hand admitted that there was social, economic and political differences between Catholics and Protestants. He also admitted that it was not to blame on the Catholics themselves and their religion, but it was to blame on the Protestants. The Catholics were discriminated and neglected against by Protestants because of their religion. Terrence was willing to improve things for the Catholics. ...read more.

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