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How did the Munich Putsch contribute to Hitler’s rise to power?

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Introduction

How did the Munich Putsch contribute to Hitler's rise to power? On 9th November 1923, Hitler, Ludendorff and 3000 S.A. men marched on Munich's army headquarters. On the way they met police barricades who opened fire, killing 16 Nazis. They were hoping to achieve from this Putsch to overthrow the government. Hitler was arrested and sentenced to five years imprisonment. Ludendorff was found not guilty. At the trial Hitler gained enormous publicity with his every word being reported on the radio and in the newspapers. ...read more.

Middle

Firstly, he learnt that the only way to get power was to stand in elections and once in power destroy the system from the inside - use democracy to destroy democracy. This is how he eventually became Fuhrer of Germany, when he became Chancellor and then passed the act enabling him to become a dictator. Secondly, he realised that he needed the support of the army and the business community. The army had refused to support Hitler in the Munich Putsch, resulting in its failure. ...read more.

Conclusion

Finally, while in prison, Hitler wrote 'Mein Kampf' (My Struggle), which allowed him to work out his own beliefs. It also provided a 'Bible' for the Nazi party. Hitler had become a politician due to the time he spent in prison thinking about why he failed in the Munich Putsch. All of these things helped Hitler gain power in 1932, and if he wasn't sent to prison in 1923, he'd have probably failed in another Putsch and had a worse fate than being sent to prison for nine months. The normal punishment for treason was death but in 1923 due to the circumstances the court was sympathetic towards Hitler. ...read more.

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Here's what a teacher thought of this essay

3 star(s)

This is a short answer but is quite realistic in terms of an exam answer that might have about 20 -30 minutes allocated to it. The writer is confident and there is a good focus on the question . It would be better if 3 key effects of the Putsch were examined and each one given more specific development and the imapact and consequences examined.

Marked by teacher Kate Forbes 25/06/2012

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