• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

How did the Munich Putsch contribute to Hitler’s rise to power?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

How did the Munich Putsch contribute to Hitler's rise to power? On 9th November 1923, Hitler, Ludendorff and 3000 S.A. men marched on Munich's army headquarters. On the way they met police barricades who opened fire, killing 16 Nazis. They were hoping to achieve from this Putsch to overthrow the government. Hitler was arrested and sentenced to five years imprisonment. Ludendorff was found not guilty. At the trial Hitler gained enormous publicity with his every word being reported on the radio and in the newspapers. ...read more.

Middle

Firstly, he learnt that the only way to get power was to stand in elections and once in power destroy the system from the inside - use democracy to destroy democracy. This is how he eventually became Fuhrer of Germany, when he became Chancellor and then passed the act enabling him to become a dictator. Secondly, he realised that he needed the support of the army and the business community. The army had refused to support Hitler in the Munich Putsch, resulting in its failure. ...read more.

Conclusion

Finally, while in prison, Hitler wrote 'Mein Kampf' (My Struggle), which allowed him to work out his own beliefs. It also provided a 'Bible' for the Nazi party. Hitler had become a politician due to the time he spent in prison thinking about why he failed in the Munich Putsch. All of these things helped Hitler gain power in 1932, and if he wasn't sent to prison in 1923, he'd have probably failed in another Putsch and had a worse fate than being sent to prison for nine months. The normal punishment for treason was death but in 1923 due to the circumstances the court was sympathetic towards Hitler. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Germany 1918-1939 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Here's what a teacher thought of this essay

3 star(s)

This is a short answer but is quite realistic in terms of an exam answer that might have about 20 -30 minutes allocated to it. The writer is confident and there is a good focus on the question . It would be better if 3 key effects of the Putsch were examined and each one given more specific development and the imapact and consequences examined.

Marked by teacher Kate Forbes 25/06/2012

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Germany 1918-1939 essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    Why did international peace collapse by 1939?

    3 star(s)

    Even thought it was Adolf Hitler's action that lead to the initial breakout of war in September 1939 there were many other factors that were important in making the war happen. Nazi Germany's highly aggressive foreign policy was clearly an important cause of the Second World War but to suggest that it is the only cause is a dramatic oversimplification.

  2. Why did the Munich Putsch fail?

    When Hitler and Ludendorff herd about the denouncing of the putsch, Ludendorff persuaded Hitler not to give up and to march into Munich to seize power as a first to marching on Berlin. Ludendorff told Hitler that he was convinced the soldiers would support their former commander, and certainly not fire on him.

  1. The Munich Putsch: success or failure?

    Hitler instigated his Putsch in a Beerhall on the 8th of November 1923. He, along with Goering and 600 stormtroopers, arrived and invaded a meeting held by the Bavarian Prime Minister Kahr at a beerhall in Munich. Hitler then took Kahr and his ministers into a side room and held them at gunpoint.

  2. The weak Weimar government was a major factor in Hitler rise to power, however ...

    It was a huge crime, a crime called treason, Hitler was arrested and charged. In the short-term the Munich Putsch was a disaster for Hitler. People did not rise up to support him, and things were looking bad for the future, but Hitler using his great oratory skills managed to

  1. The economic depression was the most important factor in Hitler's rise to power, discuss.

    Therefore, the conclusion is that the propaganda machine and pre-1929 party changes eventually created the increase in support for the Nazis in the period of 1929-32 which gave Hitler the necessary political leverage with which he was able to be involved in power-broking.

  2. To What Extent Was Nazi Germany a Totalitarian State 1933-1939?

    If the short-term recovery had been achieved with remarkable speed, the longer-term prospects for growth were more muted. The switch to war preparation did not produce any real crisis in the economy before September 1939, but did increasingly compromise the achievements already made".

  1. How did Hitler establish a dictatorship?

    The exact sequence of events will never be known, but Nazi storm troopers under the direction of G�ring were also involved in torching the place. They had befriended the arsonist and may have known or even encouraged him to burn the Reichstag that night.

  2. What was the significance of the Munich Putsch for the development of the Nazi ...

    His imprisonment, which due to his moving speech was only for a period of 9 months, was significant as, in this time, Hitler was able to reappraise his methodology and to construct what ultimately became the ?Bible of the Nazis?, Mein Kampf, in which he outlined his political philosophy.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work