• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

How did the Nazis affect the lives of young people of Germany in 1933?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

How did the Nazis affect the lives of young people of Germany in 1933? Hitler formed the Hitler Youth to teach the younger generation with Nazi ideas. He was trying to make German people who would serve the Nazi state, and go to war when asked. Before the rise of Hitler, schools in Germany were like any other school. All of the pupils learnt German, Math and Science. Along with many other subjects like History, Religious Education, Physical Education, Geography etc. In math they learnt about Pi, multiplication, long division and percentages. This was all about to change. Hitler had a plan. He knew that he needed an army although the only way of getting a large and powerful one was to have more new recruits. ...read more.

Middle

They were similar to scouts although they were very violent in what they did. They went on camps that used a lot of team work and they also marched from place to place. Each boy got a uniform and could earn badges. In 1932 100,000 boys were in the Hitler Youth. By 1939 over 8 million had joined. This was now the biggest club in the world and continued to grow. There were only approximately 9 million people in Germany at the time and 8 million of them were enrolled into the Hitler Youth giving them a future with the army. Children respected Hitler and loved him. He was seen as a saint that re-built Germany for the better. ...read more.

Conclusion

Many people objected to Hitler's ideas. Many teens formed groups called the 'swing' movement, Idelweiss pirates and the white rose group. They believed in freedom. They just wanted to have fun. They smoked and drank alcohol and then listened to American Jazz music. They would hang around the streets and graffiti the walls. Hitler hated these people who planned to ruin Hitler. He sentenced them to death. Laws were made so that teenagers could not smoke, drink or stay out late. He made a curfew for all teenagers and expected these rules to be followed out. So, Hitler and the Nazis affected the lives of many people and children through the media, with school books etc. Also with the Hitler Youth and camps. He made sure that German children were to learn the Hitler way and battle for Germany in years to come. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Germany 1918-1939 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Germany 1918-1939 essays

  1. What was the reaction of young people to the Hitler Youth/BDM ?

    On the other side former HJ squads proved that they went through a tough military education and soon became nightmares of the progressing Allied- war forces. Just 10 days after the humiliating German defeat by the Russians in Stalingrad, where 300,00 men died, Hitler agreed to the establishment of the first Hitlerjugend fighting divisions; the average age of the 12.

  2. How did the Nazi's rule affect young people in Nazi Germany?

    History was a study lesson on how the Jews tried to "undermine the great achievements of the Germans". In the eugenics class this idea was backed up by models which showed that, like in nature, a germ can harm your whole body, so in Germany the Jews could damage the whole country.

  1. How did the Nazis affect the lives of the German people?

    Sources 1.3 and 1.4 show Hitler's Passion for an army and the increase of number of children in the Hitler Youth. Year Total membership of Hitler Youth. Total population (aged 10-18 years) 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939 107,956 2,292,041 3,577,565 3,943,303 5,437,601 5,879,955 7,031,226 7,287,470 7,529,000 7,682,000 8,172,000 8,656,000 9,060,000 9,109,000 8,870,000 Nazi Economic Control.

  2. Thr opposition of the Church.

    How would they clear the nazism not only from the German life, but from the German heart? The resistance documents proved that the plotters wrote plans for that matter. There were many writers, including the conservative Goerdeler and the socialist Leber.

  1. Were the Nazis successful in controlling the lives of women and young people between ...

    Marriage loans were also issued, for every baby that they had the debt would be reduced until eventually after four children the couple would not owe any money. This resulted in more marriages but each couple generally only had two children.

  2. The philosophy of totalitarianism: What is it and how does it affect our understanding ...

    The first part of the commonly accepted definition of totalitarianism relates to a state ideology. Now, a totalitarian state does not need to follow or believe in any sort of ideology despite Friedrich and Brzezinski's claim that a totalitarian state requires "an official ideology to which general adherence [is] demanded...

  1. How Did The Nazis Change And Control Peoples Lives In Germany After 1933?

    The Nazis realised how important propaganda was as they even appointed a Minister Of propaganda Religion The Nazis controlled and changed people's lives through religion. Hitler signed an agreement with the Pope that, if the Pope persuades all bishops to take an oath of loyalty to Hitler then the Nazis would not interfere with the Catholic Church.

  2. History controlled assessment - Germany between the wars

    The government did not know what to do. In July 1930 Chancellor Brüning cut government expenditure, wages and unemployment pay - the worst thing to do during a depression. He could not get the Reichstag to agree to his actions, so President Hindenburg used Article 48 to pass the measures by decree.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work