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How did the Second Balkan War of 1913 change the relations between the powers in both eastern and western Europe?

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How did the Second Balkan War of 1913 change the relations between the powers in both eastern and western Europe? Introduction It was only after one year from the outbreak of the First Balkan War, that the Second Balkan war began in 1913.. Like the first one, this war was also confined to the newly independent Balkan powers. Its cause, likewise, was again the boundary conflict. Since the Balkan peninsula was not a big place, if the Balkan states wanted to enlarge their size by getting more territories, war became inevitable. At this time, Bulgaria sparked the fire by secretly attacking Serbia. This was primarily because Bulgaria thought that Serbia had got more that she deserved after the First Balkan War, and Bulgaria wanted to get back Eastern Rumania from Serbia by the use of force. When the war started, the Turks, Rumanians and Greeks joined in to support Serbia in her fight against the Bulgarians, Since the war was a four to one competition, Bulgaria was defeated. ...read more.


Bulgaria, Austria and Germany As the only defeated country, Bulgaria was the loser of the Second Balkan War, From this war, she learned the lesson that she should never attempt to fight alone. She then gradually tried to side with Austria and Germany because when she was forced to give up the gain that she had got in the First Balkan War in he Bucharest Conference, Russia did not help her. The occasion clearly manifested the Russian support of Serbia. Tough Germany had also not helped Bulgaria in the war because of the German linked with turkey, Romania and Greece, Germany did help prevent the others to take advantage from her during and after the war. Bulgaria also considered Austria to be a friendly state because Austria had appealed to Germany for a joint intervention on the Bulgarian side during the war, though it was turned down by Germany. As a result,, Bulgaria began to look to Germany and Austria for support after the Second Balkan War and Germany helped her to reform that further consolidated their friendship, Turkey and Germany Other than Bulgaria, Turkey also gradually looked to Germany for support. ...read more.


She decided, then to support the Austria expansion in the Balkan Peninsula in order to stop the Russian advancement there, hoping to create a new balance of power in the Balkans. The only reservation of this diplomacy was the attitude of Germany towards the Eastern Question. Anyway, it seemed to be the only thing that she could do if she wanted to continue her splendid isolation. Conclusion The situation in the Balkan peninsula after the Second Balkan War was now very clear, though it was quite complex. Russia helped Serbia' Austria created and supported Albania; Germany seized the friendship of Bulgaria and Turkey ; and Serbia and Austria were deadlocked enemies. According to these relationships, once conflicts occurred, it was very likely that Russia and Germany would come in and with their intervention, the problem would most likely escalate. Since Serbia and Austria were likely to have an armed showdown , and since Russia and Germany were their close allies, a local war between the former two would invite the coming of the latter. The local war would then become a European war and Britain. France and Italy would all be forced to join in. ...read more.

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