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How far did equality exist in Britain before the First World War?

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Introduction

How far did equality exist in Britain before the First World War? Before the first world war women did not have equality in terms of their legal status .The legal status was what women were fighting for, they want to know or have a place in the legal system and as women they wanted to have rights. Women wanted to be ale to keep their children after a marriage spilt, they wanted to keep their money and land if it was left to them after they got married. They wanted to have the right to go the school then university and get a job. They also wanted to be able to keep the money they earned from work. There were three main ladies Harriet Taylor, Josephine Butler and Emmeline Pankhurst . Harriet Taylor wanted women to have equal rights as men she wanted law to protect women from violent husbands, to keep children after divorce and for women to be independent from men. ...read more.

Middle

Annual elections, payment of MP's, No property qualifications for MP's and all constituencies to have equal number of vote. What was on the charter did not help get votes for women but eventually working class men were allowed the vote. Women achieved no equality to men. Before the First World War women did not have equality in term of Domestic service. Factory work was the most common job for a woman, if a woman wanted a paid job it was most likely that she would become a servant. Five times as many women worked as servants than in textile factories In 1750 these had been as many men servants as women, but men found that they could earn higher wages and have greater freedom if they took jobs on factories. Domestic service was seen as a suitable job for women. Some women worked in the houses of the very rich, and some became "maid of all work" doing all jobs done in larger households with many servants. ...read more.

Conclusion

The good points about clerical work was that there was plenty of work for women and that it was not as tiring as nursing or teaching but the bad points were that when you were married you had to leave you were paid less than men and sometimes you were not allowed out of lunch. Nursing was a good opportunity for women but you had to leave if you were married and top jobs were given to men, women were also paid less. There was still no equality to men because women were paid less in all jobs and had to leave once they got married. After looking at all evidence I think that before the First World War equality in Britain did not exist. Nevertheless there was some progress the greatest progress was made by Legal status I think this because many new laws were introduced that protested women a bit more in 1857 the matrimonial causes act was set up in 1870 the married Women's property act was introduced. ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

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