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How far did the Weimar Republic achieve Financial and Political stability in the 1920s?

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Introduction

How far did the Weimar Republic achieve Financial and Political stability in the 1920's? The Weimar Republic was formed at the end of the 'Great War', in the November of 1918, after Kaiser Wilhelm abdicated and moved to Holland. Because the Kaiser had given up all powers he held over Germany, under the conditions of the armistice, it was necessary for a new government to be set up. This new government came into existence in the February of 1919, and led by Friedrich Ebert, the official name of the parliament was the Reichstag. The government immediately went about trying to right some of the issues Germany faced; and achieve financial and political stability, however they were less than successful in some areas, and in some cases may have caused additional problems. I personally think that whilst the government did have some successes in stabilizing the situation in Germany, progress was limited and by the end of the 1920's the issues responsible for the instabilities had not been resolved. The German economy was in ruins at the end of WW1; this was mainly due to the harsh reparations imposed on a country that was ravished by war. ...read more.

Middle

Farmers debts mounted as the prices fell. Employment rates also remained low, though this was due to the growth of the economy not happening fast enough to support all of the people out of work. Whilst the German people's opinion of their government was falling, due to the economic issues, Germany was gaining standing in the international community, and their political standing was improving. The Dawes Plan allowed faster repayment of reparations, which did not go un-appreciated by the countries that benefited. The previously mentioned Locarno Pact was proof of Stresemann's progress in foreign affairs, as it opened Germany's eastern borders up for negotiation, undermining the Treaty of Versailles. This went someway to pacifying concerns among the German public about the effects Stresemann's politicians were having, although, many extremist groups tried to curry favor with German citizens by claiming if they were in power the Treaty would be abolished all together. In 1926, Germany became a permanent member of the League of Nations; a big step for Germany's ranking in world affairs, in addition to giving her a controlling vote in any League of Nations legislation. In 1926 Germany signed the Berlin treaty with Russia, assuring them of Germany's neutrality, should Russia ever go to war with a third party. ...read more.

Conclusion

Kahr was pressured into agreeing, but as soon as Hitler departed, he informed the relevant authorities and Hitler served nine months in prison as a result. It was a direct result of these uprisings that the Republic gained its name; the capital, Berlin, was deemed too dangerous, and meetings were instead held at Weimar, hence 'the Weimar Republic'. I am of the opinion that the government was doomed to fail achieving stability in the political regard, and that any amount of policies etc. would have only harboured further mistrust from the German public. Stability in an inherently unstable nation could not be achieved, like trying to build foundations on sand. In conclusion, I think that the government, Stresemann in particular, went to great lengths to stabilise both Germany's economic, and political issues, however, I also think many of the problems were irresolvable, and that the Weimar government could only ever be a temporary solution. The civil unrest present in Germany, and the underlying economic issues, leads me to believe that although on the surface Germany appeared to be stabilizing, underneath the facade there was turmoil, and stability could not be achieved without a major change. Sarah Coyne I-DAA Yr 10/11 ...read more.

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