• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

How far do I think Hitler was to blame for causing World War II?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

How far do I think Hitler was to blame for causing World War II? Though Hitler was one of the main causants of the war, he doesn't hold all the blame. One of the main reasons was the Versailles Treaty. The Versailles Treaty destroyed Germany ten times more after it had suffered the First World War and it caused chaos everywhere. Germany suffered hyperinflation, a decrease in trade, and overall misery. People of all classes were crushed. In Mein Kampf, Hitler exposes the main ideas he had when he came power. These were: 1. The destruction of the Treaty Of Versailles. This would allow Germany to rearm and regain lost territory. 2. To gain territory (living space) for Germany in eastern Europe. This would a war in order to defeat Soviet Bolshevism. 3. To include all German-speaking people in his proposed 'Third Reich', especially those living in Austria, the Sudeten area of Czechoslovakia and Danzig. 4. To create a 'racially pure' German state that would be the most dominant power in Europe. It's evident he had always wanted to exterminate Germany from foreign and religious groups who weren't catholic, but he hadn't idealized the Final Solution just yet. ...read more.

Middle

Hitler's actions were seen as understandable and justifiable. When Germany began re-arming in 1934, many politicians felt that Germany had a right to re-arm in order to protect herself. It was also argued that a stronger Germany would prevent the spread of Communism to the west. In 1936, Hitler argued that because France had signed a new treaty with Russia, Germany was under threat from both countries and it was essential to German security that troops were stationed in the Rhineland. France was not strong enough to fight Germany without British help and Britain was not prepared to go to war at this point. Furthermore, many believed that since the Rhineland was a part of Germany it was reasonable that German troops should be stationed there. In May 1937, Neville Chamberlain became Prime Minister of Britain. He believed that the Treaty of Versailles had treated Germany badly and that there were a number of issues associated with the Treaty that needed to be put right. He felt that giving in to Hitler's demands would prevent another war. This policy, adopted by Chamberlain's government became known as the policy of Appeasement. ...read more.

Conclusion

When the world was hit by depression in the late 1920s countries were reluctant to lose trading partners to other non-member countries. The League had no army either, a reason why it didn't do anything against the Japanese invasion in China. Soldiers were to be supplied by member countries. However, countries were reluctant to get involved and risk provoking an aggressive country into taking direct action against them and failed to provide troops. The League was also comprised of many members who couldn't agree on one thing. The Council of the League of Nations only met four times a year and decisions had to be agreed by all nations. When countries called for the League to intervene, the League had to set up an emergency meeting, hold discussions and gain the agreement of all members. This process meant that the League could not act quickly to stop an act of aggression. Hitler was merely an advocate of all this tumult and he took advantage of the harsh situation Europe was in. Hitler could not have done what he did without a country in turmoil. He was simply a man in the right place at the right time, and would never have made it into history books if Germany's condition had been better. Words: 853 ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE International relations 1900-1939 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE International relations 1900-1939 essays

  1. Germany was to blame for causing World War One.

    As France was in an alliance with Russia, Germany knew Russia would come and help them. Russia is a very big country and did not have very good communication. Germany thought it would take Russia at least six weeks to get an army organized and by that time Germany should have captured France.

  2. To what extent was Hitler to blame for WW2?

    Hitler's new confidence that he would not be challenged if he invaded Poland had been increased by the German air force's performance in the Spanish Civil War in 1937, in which he proved to the world that Germany had a powerful military.

  1. "Was the treaty of Versailles fair?"

    Turkey was left with but a toe hold on what is considered Europe. * the Turkish Straits was put under the control of the League of Nations at a time when it was dominated by Britain and France. * the land held by Turkey in Arabia was made into a

  2. To what extent was Germany responsible for causing the First World War?

    Austria-Hungary and Russia did not even have plans. Austria-Hungary relied on the success of the Schlieffen Plan and Russia did not think she would need much of a plan with her vast army.

  1. The Success Of Blitzkrieg II.

    In one week Holland had surrendered and France was not looking in good shape. The difference between the war in Poland and the war in France was the fact that both sides were roughly equal in numbers and equipment, so this proves that Germany's tactics were far better than the French's.

  2. Was Hitler the cause of WW2? A.J.P Taylor wrote the controversial The origins ...

    This meant that countries like Japan and Italy were able to attack other countries without effective punishment. All these reasons did not fear the likes of Hitler and Mussolini; in fact they gained in confidence. Therefore the failure of the League was really a vicious circle as the basic problems

  1. Versailles and Hyperinflation, Germany 1919-28.

    Lots of Germans became unemployed. People working in any kind of job other than food shop keeping or farming found it hard to make a living. This is because people didn't have money to buy anything else, other than food, so other trades were declining. Not everyone, however, was badly affected by the economic crisis.

  2. Explain how the failure of collective security and German foreign policy goals and achievements ...

    Another reason Italy continued its oppression against Abyssinia was due to the fact Italy had the power to veto any major economic sanctions that bothered her. This can be blamed due to the weak structure of the League itself. Secondly, the Manchurian crisis was mostly avoided since Japan was literally

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work