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How Hitler rose to power.

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How Hitler rose to power Introduction I In my essay I will be discussing about how Hitler became a dictator. I am hoping to show how he used Propaganda and a gift for public speeches in his journey to power. I will start off by explaining how they weren't always popular then Ill go on to say about how they used different ways of getting votes, then I will conclude what I have learnt during this essay. The Nazis were not always popular The Nazi party were not as popular in the early 1920s as they were later on in the decade. They had very little support during the start of the decade as the Germans did not have reason to vote for them. ...read more.


This made the Germans very angry. So the Nazis took advantage of this and said that they would restore the national pride. The Propaganda This was another of the main ways that the Nazis used to get votes and followers. Hitler himself used it a lot in his public speeches at mass meetings to try and get his point across and to make his audience believe that the situation of the country was worse then it was. The Nazi party did this frequently by using the Radio, newspapers, posters etc to exaggerate their views eg. Using the Jews as scapegoats and blaming the worsening economic situation on them. The Nazi promises The German people were experiencing what was called a depression. ...read more.


After much political unrest Hindenburg made Hitler the new President and Prime Minister of Germany. This allowed the Nazis almost complete power in Germany so allowing Hitler to eliminate other political parties and set the scene for him to become a complete dictator later in the decade. Conclusion Hitler and the Nazi Party rose to power for a number of reasons. The most important reason was the bitterness caused by the Treaty of Versailles. Another reason was the propaganda that Hitler and the Nazis used and the promises he made to the German people of a better life. Finally, the powers of intimidation he used made sure that he got the sort of election success that he needed to gain power in Germany. ...read more.

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