• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

How Home Rule issues shaped the views of today's Unionists and Republicans

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

History Coursework Question 2 How Home Rule issues shaped the views of today's Unionists and Republicans In the 1880's Stewart Parnell helped the Nationalists try to win Home Rule; he united groups together in Ireland under his own leadership in the Home Rule party. He brought in groups who recently had distrusted each other. The Nationalist movement was very well funded because the Irish Americans had raised a substantial amount of money for them. They had moved to America because of the famine in Ireland. By the 1880s the Nationalist movement had become very confident and very well organized. This policy became known as the New Departure. However hard Parnell tried Ireland did not win Home Rule, the Unionists had become on top. The Unionists opposed Home Rule and did so with great success. The British opposed Home Rule because trade between England and Ireland was extremely valuable. The greatest fear was about the message Home Rule for Ireland would send to other parts of Britain's vast worldwide empire. Unionists opposed Home Rule for different reasons, which included religious liberty, economic prosperity, preserving the United Kingdom and membership of the Empire. The supporters of Home Rule for the Unionists were the farmers, landowners, professionals, English MPs, Protestants and businessmen. ...read more.

Middle

They admired the achievements of Parnell and they were inspired by Irelands history, especially by past Irish revolutionaries such as Wolfe Tone.Many IRB members also belonged to Sinn Fein. Arthur Griffith as a radical revival to John Redmond's moderate Nationalist party, the IPP, founded Sinn Fein in 1905. Sinn Fein is Gaelic and can be translated as 'We ourselves alone' or 'Ourselves alone'. Griffith believed that all Irish MPS should withdraw from the Westminster. He thought that they should set up their own Parliament in Dublin. In by-elections and general elections up to 1910 Sinn Fein achieved very little. Support for Sinn Fein started to increase as tension increased over the Home Rule crisis. Griffith set out a vision of an independent Ireland, with its own government determining Irelands social and economic policies on main issues like religion and land. Young Nationalists began to feel that Sinn Feins more radical approach would be a lot more effective than Redmond's Mps in London in achieving Home Rule. The New Generation of Irish Nationalists were no longer content with Home Rule. They wanted total seperation of the whole of Ireland from Britain. ...read more.

Conclusion

1500 people were freed on questioning. 1841 of these were interned without trial in England, and 171 were tried by secret court martial resulting in 170 convictions. 90 were sentenced to death but 75 of these sentences were commuted to life imprisonment. Pearse, Connolly, Clarke, MacDonagh, MacDermott, Plunkett, and Ceannt were all executed to the outrage of the Iris public who had now started to revise their opinion of the insurgents to that of a heroic nature. The most predictable effect of these measures was to increase public sympathy. The Police authorities noted even amongst moderate Nationalists a growing ' wave of resentment', prompted by the feeling that 'unnecessary severity had been deployed'. Symptoms of the change in attitudes included; the increasing frequency of memorial masses for the executed rebels; the growing sales of photographs of them; the setting up of aid funds for their families; the appearance of songs and ballads celebrating; the ubiquity of republican flags and badges; the sight of young men marching military style at Gaelic football matches, and the shouting of rebel slogans anywhere people gathered together. There were signs that militant Nationalists were reorganizing. In mid- June 1916 Maxwell predicted that in a General Election the moderate nationalist Irish Parliamentary Party would probably be replaced. In December 1918 Sinn Fein had replaced the Parliamentary Party. Emily Boaler ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE History Projects section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE History Projects essays

  1. To what extent was the Irish Famine merely an excuse for Peel to repeal ...

    The Irish Famine was a severe crisis between the years 1845-1852, approximately one million people died of starvation and a million others emigrated either to America, England or other places within Britain. The great hunger allows us to gain an insight with an Irish perspective of the famine, this source

  2. The Rebecca Riots

    The writer was not biased towards the riots; it's neutral because it's an extract for a newspaper. It's a useful source because it gives details about the riots. It could be argued that it's biased in the sense that this article is trying to sell papers.

  1. Describe British rule in India at the end of the First World War.

    to rely and find confidence and reliability with Gandhi, since Gandhi and everyone else shared the same beliefs. Once it came to coming to agreements, such as to acts, no one managed to come to one. The British give the impression that they do things for themselves.

  2. How and Why Did The Rebecca Riots Develop?

    Even though the sources all come from the same place, they are factual, which does not indicate bias. One of the most common targets for riots and attacks that we have looked at, are workhouses. The following secondary sources written by historians go into some detail about these attacks.

  1. Easter Rising

    The British government imposed martial law on Ireland and imprisoned leaders like Arthur Griffith. The popularity of Sinn Fein increased and by the end of 1916 it had developed into a revolutionary party committed to the creation of an independent united Ireland.

  2. The year was 1912 when the Titanic set sail from Southampton, England on Wednesday ...

    around us, and before sin takes full charge of our lives, a time of innocence. The telegraph operators were kept busy transmitting messages from passengers and crew alike. People continued with their plans as the great ship ploughed across the dark deep sea, little thinking of its awesome power and

  1. To what extent and why did Machiavelli’s views on politics and human nature in ...

    He believed politics had 'its own laws of existence'5 separate from the Church. Up until Machiavelli wrote 'The Prince,' politicians and rulers wanted not only the Church but also the people they ruled to believe they were moral and ethical, more concerned with being good on earth so they would pass to heaven in the next life.

  2. How and why writers have explored different views of the First World War. ...

    It also mentions the idea that two battles are going on ? the battle of conflict and the battle to survive. At the start of the third stanza Owen talks to how ?the poignant misery of dawn begins to grow.? This is an effective use of language because dawn is

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work